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Displaying posts with tag: page (reset)
Dealing with Assertion failure in log/log0recv.c – !page || (ibool)!!page_is_comp(page) == dict_table_is_comp(index->table)

This is a somewhat uncommon error, so I wanted to take a moment and post the error and an explanation in order to make it easier for those who run into this in the future.

The main error is this (full pasted below):

InnoDB: Assertion failure in thread 139838283589376 in file log/log0recv.c line 1094
InnoDB: Failing assertion: !page || (ibool)!!page_is_comp(page) == dict_table_is_comp(index->table)

Basically, this is what it can look like after a power outage. In fact, this is the only time I have seen it, but I won’t say that it is the only way you could encounter it.

How do I deal with this, you ask?

Well, the above error shows that the internal InnoDB dictionary is corrupt.

Unfortunately, in this situation, you must recreate the tablespace. And if you don’t have a current backup + binlogs, then that means you will also need to …

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fast paging in the real world

Some time ago I attended the "Optimisation by Design" course from Open Query¹. In it, Arjen teaches how writing better queries and schemas can make your database access much faster (and more reliable). One such way of optimising things is by adding appropriate query hints or flags. These hints are magic strings that control how a server executes a query or how it returns results.

An example of such a hint is SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS. You use it in a select query with a LIMIT clause. It instructs the server to select a limited numbers of rows, but also to calculate the total number of rows that would have been returned without the limit clause in place. That total number of rows is stored in a session variable, which can be retrieved via SELECT FOUND_ROWS();  That simply reads the variable and clears it on the server, it doesn't actually have to look at any table or index data, so it's very fast.

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Using Page Fragments

Hi all,

Today I'd like to continue a blog series in which I highlight Web application tutorials for NetBeans 6.5. A few changes have been made to tutorials, among which is the featuring of MySQL as the database of choice.

seventh entry in the series will cover the tutorial, "Using Page Fragments".

In this tutorial, you use NetBeans IDE 6.5 to create an application that includes two JSF 1.2 (Woodstock) page fragment components. One fragment holds the application's logo. The second fragment holds links for navigating between the pages in the application.

A new look to a popular tutorial. Cheers!


Showing entries 1 to 3