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Showing entries 1 to 12

Displaying posts with tag: Informix (reset)

Log Buffer #151: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 151st edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs. We’re going to take a fast tour through the best blogs from the week gone by, beginning this time, with Oracle.

Jonathan Lewis writes, “It occurred to me recently that I might be making casual use of terms that weren’t necessarily very well known to the less experienced user. So I’ve decided to build a glossary of terms – and I’ll try to add to it from time to time whenever I have a few minutes.”

Jonathan might want to add “Method R” to the glossary. Cary

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Log Buffer #147: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 147th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

Let’s start this week, with blogs from the SQL Server world, where a number of excellent technical posts appear. Alexander Kuznetsov surprises his readers with this assertion: without ORDER BY, there is no default sort order. “Sounds trivial? Right, but different flavors of this myth still persist.  . . .  Because apparently many visitors agreed with this myth, I decided to post a repro script which demonstrates that this is simply not true.”

In

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Log Buffer #145: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 145th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

MySQL

Since MySQL was surely the belle of the bloggers’ ball this week—why, everyone was talking—let’s begin with it.

Baron Schwartz started something with his post examining why MySQL might not benefit from having a mother ship. Dean Ellis of niflheim responded, arguing that everyone needs the MySQL mothership. And that got Sheeri’s Cabral’s attention—she took

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Log Buffer #138: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 138th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs. If you aren’t aware of who I am, my name is Nick and I am a Senior DBA at The Pythian Group. This is my second run at hosting Log Buffer, and I hope you will enjoy it as much as I did creating it.

As we see winter giving way to summer, I thought I would start with Informix.
Over at Informix-technology Fernando talks about FUD for thought where he talks about the future of Informix vs. DB2.

Sticking with IBM, I thought


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Log Buffer #135: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 135th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

How about a little DB2 news to whet the palette? On IT, Life, DB2 pureXML, House Construction, Henrik Loeser Friedrichshafen has an item about Organic Food and pureXML. Completely unrelated! In the on-topic second part of this duo, Henrik relates the news: “I am happy to tell you that the so far separately priced pureXML feature will now be included in the core DB2 for Linux, UNIX, and Windows.” And relevant links are included in this blog.

On the DB2PORTAL Blog, Craig

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Log Buffer #123: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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This is the 123rd edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs. Welcome.

Let’s begin with some SQL Server, where it was a week of technical tips. Alexander Kuznetsov looks at defensive database programming. “In most cases LIKE conditions should by followed by ESCAPE clauses,” he asserts, continuing, “You have a choice: you can either have a CHECK constraint disallow special characters, or you can fix the procedure,” thus error-proofing your logic. Readers Alejandro Mesa and Adam Machanic suggest a couple

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Log Buffer #119: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 119th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

We start in the MySQL world with some engine news. On Brian “Krow” Aker’s Idle Thoughts, Brian explains the state of engines in Drizzle, the pared-down MySQL. He begins, “So many engines, and so little to choose from. This is one of our two major decision points in Drizzle right now.” Maria, Falcon, PBXT, and InnoDB are in the dock.

Arjen Lentz asks a simple question: Would you prefer InnoDB to be the default storage engine?, also the

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Log Buffer #109: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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It’s time again for another edition of the weekly review of database blogs, Log Buffer. Since it was a big week for SQL Server, let’s start there, shall we?

The big news — SQL Server 2008 is released, as reported by SqlServer-qa.net, in seven different versions. Aaron Bertrand introduces a new kid on the block: SQL Server 2008 Web Edition — “. . . designed for

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Log Buffer #101: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome the the 101st edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

This edition was originally claimed by Ward Pond for his SQL Server Blog. Unfortunately, Ward is, in his own words, “dealing with the aftermath of a burst appendix,” which is a very good reason not to spend your time at the computer. Ward, heal up soon! We’ll see you on LB before too long.

In lieu of the normal Log Buffer, I throw it open to our readers. Please leave a comment mentioning your favourite database blog items from the week that was, and anything else you care to say about them.

LB will be back to normal next Friday. See you then!

Log Buffer #89: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 89th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

Welcome, welcome everyone.

In writing this week’s Log Buffer, I’ve had a chance to sit down and read some excellent posts on all sorts of platforms. The depth and breadth of what’s available to house and retrieve data is astonishing.

Many of you who have read my posts will know that I’m a fan of vegetables. They are something most of us don’t eat enough of. Come on DBAs! I think we need to make a collective effort to get healthy. We need you to keep all these systems alive. I say this because I have a new found appreciation for the work we do day in and day out.

Six

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Open Source ETL tools.
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The other day I was looking for a open source, feature-rich, high performance ETL tool to use in an enterprise environment. I was disappointed nothing really seemed to match my requirements. Have I overlooked something or is this really a niche where there aren’t any viable projects? After looking in the usual places like sourceforge.net and doing a bunch of Google searches. I could not find any products that fit the bill. Here are (some of) my criteria:

  • Fast. The candidate tool has to be able to move huge amounts of information between the source and target databases quickly.
  • Flexible error handling. Data errors occur all the time, and when errors are encountered, we should be able to stop processing or log the error to a file or push the record into a violations table for subsequent processing. There are probably other popular strategies for handling errors, such as changing the
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Database TCO.
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Total cost of ownership (TCO) for relational databases is, in my opinion, comprised of 3 parts. License cost, support costs and the people costs of maintaining and managing the database.

The first component, database license cost, is a one-time fee paid to the vendor for the right to use the database on one processor. The license is generally perpetual, so youll need to work this out over the expected life time of the application or the time you’re going to continue to use database software. In some cases, if this money has already been spent, you might not include it in the TCO estimates.

Second, the ongoing support costs must be included. For Informix, DB2 and Oracle the support cost is usually a percentage (typically between 15% and 23%) of the initial license purchase price. In my experience it can range between $5k and $10K per CPU depending on which database you’re using and the

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Showing entries 1 to 12

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