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Showing entries 1 to 9

Displaying posts with tag: upgrades (reset)

ClusterControl 1.2.6 Released
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April 22, 2014 By Severalnines

 

Join our upcoming webinar New Features Webinar on ClusterControl 1.2.6 - May 13th 2014 with live demo. Click on following banner to register:

 

The Severalnines team is pleased to announce the release of ClusterControl 1.2.6. This release contains key new features along with performance improvements and bug fixes. We have outlined some of the key features below. 

 

Highlights of ClusterControl 1.2.6 include:

  • Centralized Authentication
  [Read more...]
ClusterControl 1.2.5 Released
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March 5, 2014 By Severalnines

The Severalnines team is pleased to announce the release of ClusterControl 1.2.5. This release contains key new features along with performance improvements and bug fixes. We have outlined some of the key features below. 

For additional details about the release:

  [Read more...]
ClusterControl 1.2.4 Released
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November 19, 2013 By Severalnines

The Severalnines team is pleased to announce the release of ClusterControl 1.2.4. This release contains key new features along with performance improvements and bug fixes.

We have outlined some of the key features below. For additional details about the release:

  [Read more...]
Patch Updates and New Version Upgrades of your Database Clusters
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October 1, 2013 By Severalnines

 

Database vendors regularly issue critical patch updates to address software bugs or known vulnerabilities, but for a variety of reasons, organizations are often unable to install them in a timely manner, if at all. Evidence suggests that companies are actually getting worse at patching databases, with an increased number violating compliance standards and governance policies1.

Patching that require database downtime would be of extreme concern in a 24*7 environment, however most cluster upgrades can be performed online.

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On operating system upgrades and a packager’s nightmare
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A fairy tale

Once upon a time I did an operating system upgrade, a minor one that should do no harm, but just get me up to date by fixing any bugs in the version I had been using. It seemed like a good idea.

All seemed to be fine. I use a package provided by an external vendor and not the one produced by the operating system provider as this vendor provides a newer version of the package and I need that. The vendor has to make his package fit in the os environment his package is built for and normally does a pretty good job.

I use automation to build my systems and when I built a new one some issues appeared. Related to the new version of the OS the provider had enhanced one of his packages and the installation pulled in new dependencies. The install of the external package I use then broke as it conflicted with the new dependency

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MySQL 5.5 upgrade blues (part two)
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Shortly after the MySQL 5.5 upgrade the whole cluster was upgraded with extra ram. This was a nice test to see how differently 5.1 and 5.5 behave when they A) innodb bufferpool is too small and B) when the innodb bufferpool has enough room to fit everything in memory.

The MySQL 5.5 had just the same pattern in terms of disk utilization as the other nodes before (around 30% to 40%) and after the upgrade (4% to 5%), so not much difference at all. However the number of free pages within the bufferpool is significantly lower (about 10%) than on the other nodes. This definitely needs some further investigation.

Apart from that the machine is stable and it seems we will proceed with the upgrade on the whole cluster soon.

A sidenote: I’m happy to announce that I was selected as a speaker at the Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo in San

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MySQL 5.5 upgrade blues (part one)
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At the company I work for we are still running Percona Server 5.1 in production and are slowly heading towards a Percona Server 5.5 rollout. It did take a lot of preparation in the past few months (write a my.cnf conversion script for example) and a lot of testing. A couple of machines already have been upgraded this week to 5.5 to compare performance and stability. So far the machines proved to be stable enough to keep them on 5.5 and even better: we already see a couple of benefits! However, the title wouldn’t have been blues if everything would have been a breeze, right?

First problem we ran into was that our Cacti templates broke due to the changed InnoDB status output. So I headed towards the Cacti templates and looked in the issue tracker if the issue was already known.

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Scaling Web Databases, Part 2: Adding Nodes, Evolving Schema with Zero Downtime
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In my previous post, I discussed scaling web database performance in MySQL Cluster using auto-sharding and active/active geographic replication - enabling users to scale both within and across data centers.  

I also mentioned that while scaling write-performance of any web service is critical, it is only 1 of multiple dimensions to scalability, which include:

- The need to scale operational agility to keep pace with demand. This means being able to add capacity and performance to the database, and to evolve the schema – all without downtime;

- The need to scale queries by having flexibility in the APIs used to access the database – including SQL and NoSQL interfaces;

- The need to scale the database while maintaining continuous availability.

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Why is MySQL more popular than PostgreSQL?
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There is much discussion of why MySQL (http://www.mysql.com/) is more widely adopted than PostgreSQL. The discussion I’ve heard is mostly among the PostgreSQL community members, who believe their favorite database server is better in many ways, and are sometimes puzzled why people would choose an inferior product.

There are also many comparison charts that show one server is better than the other in some ways. These don’t really seem to help people with this question, either!

I can’t answer for everyone, but I can put it in the form of a question: if I were to replace MySQL with PostgreSQL, what things do I rely on that would become painful or even force a totally different strategy? The answer turns out to be fairly simple for me: replication and upgrades.

Replication

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Showing entries 1 to 9

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