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Showing entries 1 to 24

Displaying posts with tag: scaledb (reset)

Thoughts on Xeround and Free!
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Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Everybody loves free. It is the best marketing term one could use. Once you say “FREE” the people come running. Free makes you very popular. Whether you are a politician offering something for free, or a company providing free stuff, you gain instant popularity.

Xeround is shutting down their MySQL Database as a Service (DBaaS) because their free


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Thoughts on Xeround and Free!
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Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Everybody loves free. It is the best marketing term one could use. Once you say “FREE” the people come running. Free makes you very popular. Whether you are a politician offering something for free, or a company providing free stuff, you gain instant popularity. Xeround is shutting down their MySQL Database as a Service (

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The Data Day, a few days: January 31 – February 4 2013
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Fedora confirms MariaDB plans. IBM acquires Star Analytics. And more

For 451 clients: Metamarkets hones analytic focus on digital media, takes in-memory engine open source bit.ly/VElDqs By Krishna Roy

— Matt Aslett (@maslett) February 4, 2013

For 451 Research clients: WANdisco prepares to bring active-active replication to Hadoop bit.ly/VElEL9

— Matt Aslett (@maslett) February 4, 2013

For 451 Research clients: ScaleDB returns with database-virtualization play for MySQL bit.ly/XXt7zO

— Matt Aslett (@maslett)

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Database Virtualization, What it Really Means
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This is a response to a blog postby analyst and marketing consultant Curt Monash.
Originally virtualization meant running one operating system in a window inside of another operating system, e.g. running a Linux on a Windows machine using Microsoft Virtual PC or VMWare. Then virtualization evolved to mean slicing a single server into many for more granular resource allocation (Curt’s ex uno plures, translated: out of one, many). It has since expanded to include e pluribus unum (from many, one) and e pluribus ad pluribus (from many to many). This is evidenced in the use of the term “virtualization” to create the compound words: server virtualization, storage virtualization, network virtualization and now database virtualization.
Server


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Database Virtualization, What it Really Means
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This is a response to a blog postby analyst and marketing consultant Curt Monash. Originally virtualization meant running one operating system in a window inside of another operating system, e.g. running a Linux on a Windows machine using Microsoft Virtual PC or VMWare. Then virtualization evolved to mean slicing a single server into many for more granular resource allocation (Curt’s ex uno plures, translated: out of one, many). It has since expanded to include e pluribus unum (from many, one) and e pluribus ad pluribus (from many to many). This is evidenced in the use of the term “virtualization” to create the compound words: server virtualization, storage

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New MySQL & MariaDB Instructional Videos from SkySQL
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Are you looking to expand your knowledge about MySQL and MariaDB database solutions?

Well, you’re in luck! SkySQL is introducing an exclusive collection of educational videos featuring some of the industry’s leading experts on the MySQL database and related technologies. View informative, technical talks on a variety of topics, from the experts at SkySQL, MariaDB, Calpont InfiniDB, Continuent, ScaleDB, Severalnines, Sphinx, Webyog, and others.

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Vote for MySQL[plus] awards 2011 !
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First of all, I wish you a happy new year.
Many things happened last year, it was really exciting to be involved in the MySQL ecosystem.
I hope this enthusiasm will be increased this year, up to you !

To start the year, I propose the MySQL[plus] Awards 2011
It will only take 5 minutes to fill out these polls.
Answer with your heart first and then with your experience with some of these tools or services.

Polls will be closed January 31, so, vote now !
For “other” answers, please,  let me a comment with details.

Don’t hesitate to submit proposal for tools or services in the comments.






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Cloud DaaS Managed Service Fuels NewSQL Market
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As public clouds are commoditized, the public cloud vendors are increasingly moving to higher margin and stickier managed services. In the early days of the public cloud, renting compute and storage was unique, exciting, sticky and profitable. It has quickly become a commodity. In order to provide differentiation, maintain margins and create barriers to customer exit, against increasing competition, the cloud is moving toward a collection of managed services.
Public clouds are growing beyond simple compute instances to platform as a service (PaaS). PaaS is then comprised of various modules, including database as a service (DaaS). In the early days you rented a number of compute instances, loaded your database software and you were the DBA managing all aspects of that database. Increasingly, public clouds are moving toward a DaaS model, where the cloud customer
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ScaleDB: Shared-Disk / Shared-Nothing Hybrid
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The primary database architectures—shared-disk and shared-nothing—each have their advantages. Shared-disk has functional advantages such as high-availability, elasticity, ease of set-up and maintenance, eliminates partitioning/sharding, eliminates master-slave, etc. The shared-nothing advantages are better performance and lower costs. What if you could offer a database that is a hybrid of the two; one that offers the advantages of both. This sounds too good to be true, but it is fact what ScaleDB has done.
The underlying architecture is shared-disk, but in many situations it can operate like shared-nothing. You see the problems with shared-disk arise from the messaging necessary to (a) ship data among nodes and storage; and (b) synchronize the nodes in the cluster. The trick is to move the messaging outside of the transaction so it
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Database Architectures & Performance II
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As described in the prior post, the shared-disk performance dilemma is simple:

1. If each node stores/processes data in memory, versus disk, it is much faster.
2. Each node must expose the most recent data to the other nodes, so those other nodes are not using old data.

In other words, #1 above says flush data to disk VERY INFREQUENTLY for better performance, while #2 says flush everything to disk IMMEDIATELY for data consistency.

Oracle recognized this dilemma when they built Oracle Parallel Server (OPS), the precursor to Oracle Real Application Cluster (RAC). In order to address the problem, Oracle developed Cache Fusion.

Cache fusion is a peer-based shared cache. Each node works with a certain set of data in its local cache, until








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ScaleDB Introduces Clustered Database Based Upon Water Vapor
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ScaleDB is proud to announce the introduction of a database that takes data storage to a new level, and a new altitude. ScaleDB’s patent pending “molecular-flipping technology” enables low energy molecular flipping that changes selected water molecules from H20 to HOH, representing positive and negative states that mimic the storage mechanism used on hard drive disks.

“Because we act at the molecular level, we achieve massive storage density with minimal energy consumption, which is critical in today’s data centers, where energy consumption is the primary cost,” said Mike Hogan, ScaleDB CEO. “A single thimble of water vapor provides the same storage capacity as a high-end SAN.”

The technology does have one small challenge: persistence. Clouds are not known for their persistence. ScaleDB relies on the Cumulus formation, since it is far



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Comparing Cloud Databases: SimpleDB, RDS and ScaleDB
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Amazon’s SimpleDB isn’t a relational database, but it does provide elastic scalability and high-availability. Amazon’s recently announced Relational Database Services (RDS) is a relational database, but it doesn’t provide elastic scalability or high-availability. If you are deploying enterprise applications on the cloud (including Amazon Web Services), you might want to look at ScaleDB because it is a relational database and it does provide elastic scalability and high-availability.

Amazon describes SimpleDB by comparing it to a clustered database:

"A traditional, clustered relational database requires a sizable upfront capital outlay, is complex to design, and often requires extensive and repetitive database administration. Amazon SimpleDB is dramatically simpler, requiring no schema, automatically indexing your data and providing a simple API for storage and access.

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Comparing Cloud Databases: SimpleDB, RDS and ScaleDB
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Amazon’s SimpleDB isn’t a relational database, but it does provide elastic scalability and high-availability. Amazon’s recently announced Relational Database Services (RDS) is a relational database, but it doesn’t provide elastic scalability or high-availability. If you are deploying enterprise applications on the cloud (including Amazon Web Services), you might want to look at ScaleDB because it is a relational database and it does provide elastic scalability and high-availability.

Amazon describes SimpleDB by comparing it to a clustered database:

"A traditional, clustered relational database requires a sizable upfront capital outlay, is complex to design, and often requires extensive and repetitive database administration. Amazon SimpleDB is dramatically simpler, requiring no schema, automatically indexing your

  [Read more...]
Video: The ScaleDB shared-disk clustering Storage Engine for MySQL
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Mike Hogan, CEO of ScaleDB spoke at the Boston MySQL User Group in September 2009:

ScaleDB is a storage engine for MySQL that delivers shared-disk clustering. It has been described as the Oracle RAC of MySQL. Using ScaleDB, you can scale your cluster by simply adding nodes, without partitioning your data. Each node has full read/write capability, eliminating the need for slaves, while delivering cluster-level load balancing. ScaleDB is looking for additional beta testers, there is a sign up at http://www.scaledb.com.

Slides are online (and downloadable) at http://www.slideshare.net/Sheeri/scale-db-preso-for-boston-my-sql-meetup-92009

Watch the video online at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=emu2WfNx4KA or directly embedded here:

EU Should Protect MySQL-based Special Purpose Database Vendors
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In my recent post on the EU antitrust regulators' probe into the Oracle Sun merger I did not mention an important class of stakeholders: the MySQL-based special purpose database startups. By these I mean:

I think it's safe to say the first three are comparable in the sense that they are all analytical databases: they are designed for data warehousing and business intelligence applications. ScaleDB might be a good fit for those applications, but I think






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The EC is mostly, but not entirely, wrong about Oracle/MySQL
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By now you are probably aware that the European Commission has decided to launch an extended investigation into Oracle’s acquisition of Sun based on concerns over MySQL.

The new has prompted a lot of criticism of the EC, much of it suggesting that the delay will do considerable harm to Sun (and therefore Oracle). This argument is valid - Sun’s already declining revenue has been in freefall since the deal was announced and one wonders how far it will fall in another 90 days of stasis.

Other criticism, (such as this from Matt Asay) focuses on the suggestion that the delay will do little to help MySQL or its users, and that the EC fails to understand open

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Cloud Computing Ideal for Shared-Disk Databases
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Cloud computing is disrupting many aspects of computing. One need only witness the manner in which online applications like Google Docs and Salesforce.com are disrupting entrenched competitors. Soon, cloud computing will significantly disrupt the database market, for the reasons explained below.

One of the most powerful arguments in technology is the price/performance ratio. Significant declines in price or significant increases in performance can result in disruption. When you get both price declines and performance increases, you get significant disruption. This is exactly what is coming to the database market.

The Past
Moore’s Law enabled the CPU to process data faster than the hard disk drive could get the data to the CPU. Because getting data to the CPU was the bottleneck, the database that solved that bottleneck would have a performance

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Cloud Computing Ideal for Shared-Disk Databases
+0 Vote Up -0Vote Down

Cloud computing is disrupting many aspects of computing. One need only witness the manner in which online applications like Google Docs and Salesforce.com are disrupting entrenched competitors. Soon, cloud computing will significantly disrupt the database market, for the reasons explained below.

One of the most powerful arguments in technology is the price/performance ratio. Significant declines in price or significant increases in performance can result in disruption. When you get both price declines and performance increases, you get significant disruption. This is exactly what is coming to the database market.

The Past
Moore’s Law enabled the CPU to process data faster than the hard disk drive could get the data to the CPU. Because getting data to the CPU was the bottleneck, the database that solved that bottleneck would have a

  [Read more...]
Is ScaleDB Using MapReduce? Competing with Hadoop?
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I’ve had a few VCs ask how we compare to Hadoop and companies using MapReduce. With Google blessing MapReduce, it seems to be the cool new thing. I figure I’m going to have to explain this to VCs, so I might as well blog about it.

MapReduce is a process of dividing a problem into small pieces and distributing (mapping) those pieces to a large number of computers. Then it collects the processed data and merges (reduces) it into a result set. Hadoop provides the plumbing, so users focus on writing the query and Hadoop handles the dirty work of mapping and reducing. Such a query, using a procedural language like Java, is more complex than a comparable SQL query, but more on that below.

So what is MapReduce good for? It really shines when you want to summarize, analyze or transform a very large data set. This is why it is well suited to web data. Map reduce

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Is ScaleDB Using MapReduce? Competing with Hadoop?
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I’ve had a few VCs ask how we compare to Hadoop and companies using MapReduce. With Google blessing MapReduce, it seems to be the cool new thing. I figure I’m going to have to explain this to VCs, so I might as well blog about it.

MapReduce is a process of dividing a problem into small pieces and distributing (mapping) those pieces to a large number of computers. Then it collects the processed data and merges (reduces) it into a result set. Hadoop provides the plumbing, so users focus on writing the query and Hadoop handles the dirty work of mapping and reducing. Such a query, using a procedural language like Java, is more complex than a comparable SQL query, but more on that below.

So what is MapReduce good for? It really shines when you want to summarize, analyze or transform a very large data set. This is why it is well suited to web data. Map reduce

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451 CAOS Links 2009.06.30
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Governments. Governance. Customers wins. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

Governments
The Examiner provided a two part interview with Daniel Risascher, Office of the CIO, Department of Defense, on open source at the DoD, while Government Technology Magazine reported on how open source software and cloud computing can save government money. Similarly, The UK Conservative party delivered a paper on the future of open standards, open source, SOA and cloud for UK Government, while it was reported that Vienna to teach its public servants


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Are closed-source MySQL storage engines compatible with MariaDB?
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Following the launch of the Open Database Alliance some people have assumed that it is only a matter of time before MariaDB becomes the de facto replacement for MySQL.

That assumes that Oracle will allow the development of MySQL to stagnate, either deliberately or through neglect - something that we have expressed our doubts about, but even if that were the case it appears that the GPL (or more to the point MySQL’s dual licensing strategy) may restrict the potential for MariaDB.

Curt Monash recently raised the question of whether closed-source storage engines can be used with MySQL (and, by

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The Platform is Everything
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“… when you get the money, you get the power. Then when you get the power, then you get the women.” –Tony “Scarface” Montana

In the world of computing, first you get the users, then you get the applications, then you get the power. What do I mean by power? In a word “platform”. If the only way for users to get applications is through you, and the only way for application developers to get to users is through you, then you are a platform. If you continue to nurture and grow your platform, your company is immortal, it is a goose that will continue to lay golden eggs…as long as you continue to nurture it.

To get the users, you need to deliver immediate value. Once you achieve critical mass of users, the developers will start showing up, whether you want them or not. A good example of this was

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MySQL?s storage engine program picks up steam
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The solidDB for MySQL database engine for MySQL may have lost its sponsor following IBM’s acquisition of Solid Info Tech but events at this week’s MySQL Conference and Expo prove the certified engines program is alive and well.

Not only has Oracle announced that its Innobase subsidiary has updated InnoDB transactional storage engine, but there is also a new member of the certified engines program.

Kickfire has recently

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Showing entries 1 to 24

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