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Displaying posts with tag: David Busby (reset)
What stopped MySQL? Tracing back signals sent to MySQL

Have you ever had a case where you needed to find a process which sent a HUP/KILL/TERM or other signal to your database? Let me rephrase. Did you ever have to find which process messed up your night? If so, you might want to read on. I’m going to tell you how you can find it.

Granted, on small and/or meticulously managed systems tracking down the culprit is probably not a big deal. You can likely identify your process simply by checking what processes have enough privileges to send mysqld a HUP/KILL/TERM signal. However, frequently we see cases where this may not work or the elimination process would be too tedious to execute.

We recently had a case where a process was frequently sending SIGHUPs to mysqld and the customer asked us to see if we could get rid of his annoyance. This blog is the direct result of a discussion I had with my colleague …

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How to test if CVE-2015-0204 FREAK SSL security flaw affects you

The CVE-2015-0204 FREAK SSL vulnerability abuses intentionally weak “EXPORT” ciphers which could be used to perform a transparent Man In The Middle attack. (We seem to be continually bombarded with not only SSL vulnerabilities but the need to name vulnerabilities with increasing odd names.)

Is your server vulnerable?

This can be tested using the following GIST

If the result is 0; the server is not providing the EXPORT cipher; and as such is not vulnerable.

Is your client vulnerable?

Point your client to if this returns “Vulnerable” then the client is vulnerable, if you find a connection error your client should not be vulnerable for example:

root@host:/tmp$ openssl …

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GHOST vulnerability (CVE-2015-0235) Percona response

Cloud security company Qualys announced Tuesday the issues prevalent in glibc since version 2.2 introduced in 2000-11-10 (the complete Qualys announcement may be viewed here). The vulnerability, CVE-2015-0235, has been dubbed “GHOST.”

As the announcement from Qualys indicates, it is believed that MySQL and by extension Percona Server are not affected by this issue.

Percona is in the process of conducting our own review into the issue related to the Percona Server source code – more information will be released as soon as it is available.

In the interim the current advisory is to update your glibc packages for your distributions if they are in fact vulnerable. The C code from the Qualys announcement may aid in your diagnostics, section 4 of …

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File carving methods for the MySQL DBA

This is a long overdue blog post from London’s 44con Cyber Security conference back in September. A lot of old memories were brought to the front as it were; the one I’m going to cover in this blog post is: file carving.

So what is file carving? despite the terminology it’s not going to be a full roast dinner; unless you have an appetite for data which as you’re here I’m assuming you have.

The TL;DR of “what is file carving” is taking a target blob of data (often a multi GB / TB file) and reducing it in to targeted pieces of data, this could be for instance grabbing all the jpeg images in a packet capture / mysqldump; or pulling that single table/schema out of a huge mysqldump with –all-databases (if you’re not using mydumper you really …

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How to close POODLE SSLv3 security flaw (CVE-2014-3566)

Padding Oracle On Downgraded Legacy Encryption

First off, the naming “convention” as of late for security issues has been terrible. The newest vulnerability (CVE­-2014-3566) is nicknamed POODLE, which at least is an acronym and as per the header above has some meaning.

The summary of this issue is that it is much the same as the earlier B.E.A.S.T (Browser Exploit Against SSL TLS), however there’s no known mitigation method in this case – other than entirely disabling SSLv3 support, in short, an attacker has a vector by which they can retrieve the plaintext form your encrypted streams.

So let’s talk mitigation, the …

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‘Bash Bug’ giving you Shellshock? CVE-2014-6271 update

The media train is in full steam today over the the CVE-2014-6271 programming flaw, better known as the “Bash Bug” or “Shellshock” – the original problem was disclosed on Wednesday via this post. Firstly this issue exploits bash environment variables in order to execute arbitrary commands; a simple check for this per the Red Hat security blog is the following:

env x='() { :;}; echo vulnerable’ bash -c “echo this is a test”

If you see an error:

bash: warning: x: ignoring function definition attempt
bash: error importing function definition for `x’

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Systemtap solves phantom MySQLd SIGTERM / SIGKILL issue

The Percona Managed Services team recently faced a somewhat peculiar client issue. We’d receive pages about their MySQL service being unreachable. However, studying the logs showed nothing out of the ordinary…. for the most part it appeared to be a normal shutdown and there was nothing in anyone’s command history nor a cron task to speak of that was suspicious.

This is one of those obscure and peculiar (read: unique) issues that triggered an old memory; I’d seen this behavior before and I had just the tool to catch the culprit in the act.

Systemtap made diagnostics of this issue possible and I can’t state enough how much of a powerful and often under-utilized tool set systemtap really is.

cat > signals.stp << EOF
probe signal.send {
if (sig_name == …

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Benchmark: SimpleHTTPServer vs pyclustercheck (twisted implementation)

Github user Adrianlzt provided a python-twisted alternative version of pyclustercheck per discussion on issue 7.

Due to sporadic performance issues noted with the original implementation in SimpleHTTPserver, the benchmarks which I’ve included as part of the project on github use mutli-mechanize library,

  • cache time 1 sec
  • 2 x 100 thread pools
  • 60s ramp up time
  • 600s total duration
  • testing simulated node fail (always returns 503, rechecks mysql node on cache expiry)
  • AMD FX(tm)-8350 Eight-Core Processor
  • Intel 330 SSD
  • local loop back test (

The SimpleHTTPServer instance faired as follows:

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Heartbleed: Separating FAQ From FUD

If you’ve been following this blog (my colleague, David Busby, posted about it yesterday) or any tech news outlet in the past few days, you’ve probably seen some mention of the “Heartbleed” vulnerability in certain versions of the OpenSSL library.

So what is ‘Heartbleed’, really?

In short, Heartbleed is an information-leak issue. An attacker can exploit this bug to retrieve the contents of a server’s memory without any need for local access. According to the researchers that discovered it, this can be done without leaving any trace of compromise on the system. In other words, if you’re vulnerable, they can steal your keys and you won’t even notice that they’ve gone missing. I use the word “keys” literally here; by being able to access the contents of the impacted service’s memory, the attacker is …

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OpenSSL heartbleed CVE-2014-0160 – Data leaks make my heart bleed

The heartbleed bug was introduced in OpenSSL 1.0.1 and is present in

  • 1.0.1
  • 1.0.1a
  • 1.0.1b
  • 1.0.1c
  • 1.0.1d
  • 1.0.1e
  • 1.0.1f

The bug is not present in 1.0.1g, nor is it present in the 1.0.0 branch nor the 0.9.8 branch of OpenSSL some sources report 1.0.2-beta is also affected by this bug at the time of writing, however it is a beta product and I would really recommend not to use beta quality releases for something as fundamentally important as OpenSSL in production.

The bug itself is within the heartbeat extension of OpenSSL (RFC6520). The bug allows an attacker to leak the memory in up to 64k chunks, this is not to say the data being leaked is limited to 64k as the attacker can continually abuse this bug to leak data, until they are satisfied with what has been …

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