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Displaying posts with tag: Pinterest (reset)
MySQL performance optimization: 50% more work with 60% less latency variance

When I joined Pinterest, my first three weeks were spent in Base Camp, where the newest engineering hires work on real production issues across the entire software stack. In Base Camp, we learn how Pinterest is built by building it, and it’s not uncommon to be pushing code and making meaningful contributions within just a few days. At Pinterest, newly hired engineers have the flexibility to choose which team they’ll join, and working on different parts of the code as part of the Base Camp experience can help with this decision. Base Campers typically work on a variety of tasks, but my project was a deep dive into a MySQL performance optimization project.

Pinterest, MySQL and AWS, oh my!

We work with MySQL running entirely inside Amazon Web Services (AWS). Despite using fairly high-powered instance types with RAID-0 SSDs and a fairly simple workload (many point selects by PK or simple ranges) that peaks around 2,000 …

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Learn to stop using shiny new things and love MySQL

A good portion of the startups I meet and advise want to use the newest, hottest technology to build something that’s cool, but not technologically groundbreaking. I have yet to meet a startup building a time machine, teleporter or quantum social network that would actually require some amazing new tech. They have awesome new ideas with down-to-earth technical requirements, so I kept wondering why they choose this shiny (and risky) new stuff when all they need is a good ol’ trustworthy database. I think it’s because many assume that building the latest and greatest needs the latest and greatest!

It turns out that’s only one of three bad reasons (traps) why people go for the shiny and new. Reason two is people mistakenly assume older stuff is slow, not feature rich or won’t scale. “MySQL is sluggish,” they say. “Java is slow,” I’ve heard. “Python won’t scale,” they claim. None of it’s true.

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Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo 2013: It feels like 2007 again

I actually don’t remember exactly whether it was in 2006, 2007 or 2008 — but around that time the MySQL community had one of the greatest MySQL conferences put on by O’Reilly and MySQL. It was a good, stable, predictable time.

Shortly thereafter, the MySQL world saw acquisitions, forks, times of uncertainly, more acquisitions, more forks, rumors (“Oracle is going to kill MySQL and the whole Internet”) and just a lot of drama and politics.

And now, after all this time some 6 or 7 years later, it feels like a MySQL Renaissance. All of the major MySQL players are coming to the Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo 2013. I am happy to see Oracle’s engineers coming with talks — and now with a great MySQL 5.6 release — and I have great …

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Being successful like Pinterest without its DB adventures...

I just came across this: "Scaling Pinterest and adventures in database sharding"  (
"Pinterest has learned about scaling the way most popular sites do — the architecture works until one day it doesn’t"Pinterest found out that "the architecture" is not scalable and they turned to development of a Scale Out mechanism also called Sharding.

I find it amazing that sharding, or in other words, the idea of "scale out by splitting and parallelizing data across shared-nothing commodity-hardware" is not supplied "out of the box" by "the architecture" (such as database, load-balancer, any other IT stuff). I'm wondering who was the one that decided that an IT issue like scale-out should be outsourced from the database to the …

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Showing entries 1 to 4