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Displaying posts with tag: archiving (reset)

Maatkit version 1709 released
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This release contains bug fixes and new features. It also contains a new tool: my implementation of Paul Tuckfield's relay log pipelining idea. I have had quite a few responses to that blog post, and requests for the code. So I'm releasing it as part of Maatkit.

MySQL Archiver can now archive each row to a different table
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One of the enhancements I added to MySQL Archiver in the recent release was listed innocently in the changelog as "Destination plugins can now rewrite the INSERT statement." Not very exciting or informative, huh? Keep reading.

MySQL Toolkit version 675 released
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I've just released changes to two of the tools in MySQL Toolkit. MySQL Table Checksum got some convenient functionality to help you recursively check slaves for bad replicated checksum chunks. MySQL Archiver got statistics-gathering functionality to help you optimize your archiving and purging jobs, plus a few important bug fixes.

Archive strategies for OLTP servers, Part 3
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In the first two articles in this series, I discussed archiving basics, relationships and dependencies, and specific archiving techniques for online transaction processing (OLTP) database servers. This article covers how to move the data from the OLTP source to the archive destination, what the archive destination might look like, and how to un-archive data. If you can un-archive easily and reliably, a whole new world of possibilities opens up.

Archive strategies for OLTP servers, Part 2
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In the first article in this series on archiving strategies for online transaction processing (OLTP) database servers, I covered some basics: why to archive, and what to consider when gathering requirements for the archived data itself. This article is more technical. I want to help you understand how to choose which rows are archivable, and how to deal with complex data relationships and dependencies. In that context, I'll also discuss a few concrete archiving strategies, their strengths and shortcomings, and how they can satisfy your requirements, especially requirements for data consistency, which as you will see is one of the most difficult problems in archiving.

Archive strategies for OLTP servers, Part 1
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In May 2005, I wrote a widely-referenced article about how to efficiently archive and/or purge data from online transaction processing (OLTP) database servers. That article focused on how to write efficient archiving SQL. In this article I'll discuss archiving strategy, not tactics. OLTP servers tend to have complex schemas, which makes it important and sometimes difficult to design a good archiving strategy.

MySQL Archiver 0.9.2 released
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This release fixes some minor bugs and adds a plugin mechanism. Now you can extend MySQL Archiver with your own code easily. You could use this to run setup and tear-down, hook code into the archiving process, and more. Possibilities include building summary tables in a data warehouse during archiving, handling dependencies such as foreign keys before archiving each row, or applying advanced logic to determine which rows to archive.

MySQL Archiver 0.9.1 released
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MySQL Archiver is the implementation of the efficient forward-only archiving and purging strategies I wrote about more than a year ago. It nibbles rows from a table, then inserts them into another table and/or writes them to a file. The object is to do this without interfering with critical online transaction-processing (OLTP) queries.

Showing entries 1 to 8

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