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Displaying posts with tag: defaults (reset)
An update on default_password_lifetime

With MySQL 5.7, our goal is to be secure by default. This means that without having to change configuration settings or perform any additional steps, your fresh installation should be safe for production use.

As part of this security initiative, MySQL 5.7 shipped with a new feature where user accounts will be disabled if the password has not been changed in a number of days.…

Improved Server Defaults in 5.7

Morgan and I started an initiative a while back to improve the “out of the box” configuration and behavior defaults for MySQL. Working closely with the Community, we were able to come up with a good list of improvements. This work really began to bear fruit starting with the MySQL 5.7.7 release.…

MySQL defaults evolution

MySQL, the original brand, the one developed by the MySQL team at Oracle, is steadily evolving. You can feel it if you try every new release that comes out of the milestone release cycle. Or even if you don’t try all of them, just testing a release once in a while gives you something to think about.

The engineers at Oracle are trying hard to improve the defaults. If you are the out-of-the-box type, and just install the new version on top of the previous one, leaving the same setup in place, you may be up for a for a few surprises. It’s the marketing, see? They tell you that just by replacing your old MySQL (5.1 or 5.5) with MySQL 5.6 you get 30% to 70% performance improvement. Which happens to be true, not only because the server is better, but also because they have changed the defaults. However, this change in defaults may come with some serious consequences for the ones who …

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Thoughts on Upcoming MySQL 5.6 Defaults

Read the original article at Thoughts on Upcoming MySQL 5.6 Defaults

During Oracle Open World 2012 and the parallel MySQL Connect conference, the new 5.6 version was announced. It’s only release candidate right now, but that means the GA release is just around the corner. With that James Day has posted changes to various of the new parameter defaults. Many of them you may not run [...]

For more articles like these go to Sean Hull's Scalable Startups

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The Problems of Managing MySQL’s Configuration

I want to keep a record of the configuration of the MySQL servers I manage. The configuration of some servers differs from others and over time the configuration may vary, partly as a result of upgrades in the mysql version or the use of the particular mysql instance, so tracking this is important.

Configuration items in MySQL can be thought of in 2 separate parts: the static configuration files which determine the behaviour of the server when it starts up (my.cnf) and the running configuration of the server in question. The latter information is usually obtained by running SHOW GLOBAL VARIABLES and SHOW SLAVE STATUS if the server is a slave.

I’d also like to compare the 2 sets of configuration so I can see if a local change has been made to the running server which is not reflected in its configuration file. I might want to correct this, or at least be aware of it.

However, collecting and …

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Showing entries 1 to 5