Home |  MySQL Buzz |  FAQ |  Feeds |  Submit your blog feed |  Feedback |  Archive |  Aggregate feed RSS 2.0 English Deutsch Español Français Italiano 日本語 Русский Português 中文
Showing entries 1 to 3

Displaying posts with tag: parallelization (reset)

Increasing slow query performance with the parallel query execution
+1 Vote Up -0Vote Down

MySQL and Scaling-up (using more powerful hardware) was always a hot topic. Originally MySQL did not scale well with multiple CPUs; there were times when InnoDB performed poorer with more  CPU cores than with less CPU cores. MySQL 5.6 can scale significantly better; however there is still 1 big limitation: 1 SQL query will eventually use only 1 CPU core (no parallelism). Here is what I mean by that: let’s say we have a complex query which will need to scan million of rows and may need to create a temporary table; in this case MySQL will not be able to scan the table in multiple threads (even with partitioning) so the single query will not be faster on the more powerful server. On the contrary, a server with more slower CPUs will show worse performance

  [Read more...]
Advanced MySQL Query Tuning: Webinar followup Q&A
+1 Vote Up -0Vote Down

Thanks to all who attended my “MySQL Query Tuning” webinar on July 24.  If you missed it, you can you can download the slides and also watch the recorded video. Thank you for the excellent questions after the webinar as well. Query tuning is a big topic and, due to the limited time, I had to skip some material, especially some of the monitoring. I would like, however, to answer all the questions I did not get into during the webinar session.

Q: Did you reset the query cache before doing your benchmark on your query? 0.00

  [Read more...]
5 Things That Are Toxic to Scalability
+0 Vote Up -0Vote Down
Scalability is about application, architecture and infrastructure design, and careful management of server components.

1. Object Relational Mappers

ORMs are popular among developers but not among performance experts.  Why is that?  Primarily these two engineers experience a web application from entirely different perspectives.  One is building functionality, delivering features, and results are measured on fitting business requirements.  Performance and scalability are often low priorities at this stage.  ORMs allow developers to be much more productive, abstracting away the SQL difficulties of interacting with the backend datastore, and allowing them to concentrate on building the features and functionality.

On the performance side the picture is a bit different.  By leaving SQL query writing to an ORM, you are faced with complex queries that

  [Read more...]
Showing entries 1 to 3

Planet MySQL © 1995, 2014, Oracle Corporation and/or its affiliates   Legal Policies | Your Privacy Rights | Terms of Use

Content reproduced on this site is the property of the respective copyright holders. It is not reviewed in advance by Oracle and does not necessarily represent the opinion of Oracle or any other party.