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Displaying posts with tag: LSM (reset)

XLDB Tutorial on Data Structures and Algorithms
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Next week Michael and I (Bradley) will be travelling to Silicon Valley to present a tutorial on Data Structures and Algorithms for Big Databases at the 6th XLDB Conference.

The tutorial, which is 4 hours on Monday afternoon, aims to cover the following topics (but it’s looking like we’ll have to drop several items for lack of time.)

This tutorial will explore data structures and algorithms for big databases. The topics include:

  • Data structures including B-trees, Log Structured Merge Trees, and Streaming B-trees.
  • Approximate Query Membership data structures including Bloom filters and cascade filters.
  • Algorithms for join including hash joins and
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Write Optimization: Myths, Comparison, Clarifications, Part 2
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In my last post, we talked about the read/write tradeoff of indexing data structures, and some ways that people augment B-trees in order to get better write performance. We also talked about the significant drawbacks of each method, and I promised to show some more fundamental approaches.

We had two “workload-based” techniques: inserting in sequential order, and using fewer indexes, and two “data structure-based” techniques: a write buffer, and OLAP. Remember, the most common thing people do when faced with an insertion bottleneck is to use fewer indexes, and this kills query performance. So keep in mind that all our work on write-optimization is really work for read-optimization, in that write-optimized

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Write Optimization: Myths, Comparison, Clarifications
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Some indexing structures are write optimized in that they are better than B-trees at ingesting data. Other indexing structures are read optimized in that they are better than B-trees at query time. Even within B-trees, there is a tradeoff between write performance and read performance. For example, non-clustering B-trees (such as MyISAM) are typically faster at indexing than clustering B-trees (such as InnoDB), but are then slower at queries.

This post is the first of two about how to understand write optimization, what it means for overall performance, and what the difference is between different write-optimized indexing schemes. We’ll be talking about how to deal with workloads that don’t fit in memory—in particular, if we had our data in B-trees, only the internal nodes (perhaps not even all of them) would fit

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Showing entries 1 to 3

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