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Displaying posts with tag: node (reset)
The Uber Engineering Tech Stack, Part II: The Edge and Beyond

The end of a two-part series on the tech stack that Uber Engineering uses to make transportation as reliable as running water, everywhere, for everyone, as of spring 2016.

The post The Uber Engineering Tech Stack, Part II: The Edge and Beyond appeared first on Uber Engineering Blog.

My experience with node and mongodb course "M101JS: MongoDB for Node.js Developers" (Third Week)

Well, currently I am into the third week of mongodb node course "M101JS: MongoDB for Node.js Developers" and I am pretty enjoying it.

Lots of personal learning into node and mongodb.

The third week subject of "Patterns, Case Studies & Tradeoffs" is really interesting.

Here is a list of topics, I learned about:
- Mongodb rich documents concept.
- Mongodb schema use cases.
- Mongodb one:one, one:many, many:many use cases.
- How to select schema based on the usage like whether you want max performance
  or it may be a tradeoff.

One important point, I learned during the course is:
"While relational databases usually go for the normalised 3rd form so that data usage is agnostic to application, but mongodb schema arrangement is very closely related to application usage and varies accordingly."

Stop comparing stuff you don't understand

I normally don't do this. When I see someone write a blog post I don't agree with, I often just dismiss it and go on. But, this particular one caught my attention. It was titled PHP vs Node.js: Yet Another Versus. The summary was:

Node.js = PHP + Apache + Memcached + Gearman - overhead

What the f**k? Are you kidding me? Clearly this person has NEVER used memcached or Gearman in a production environment that had any actual load.

Back in the day, when URLs and filesystems had a 1:1 mapping, it made perfect sense to have a web server separate from the language it is running. But, nowadays, any PHP app with attractive URLs running behind the Apache web server is going to need a .htaccess file, which tells the server a regular expression to check before serving up a file. Sound complex and awkward …

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Understanding B+tree Indexes and how they Impact Performance

Indexes are a very important part of databases and are used frequently to speed up access to particular data item or items. So before working with indexes, it is important to understand how indexes work behind the scene and what is the data structure that is used to store these indexes, because unless you understand the inner working of an index, you will never be able to fully harness its power.

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