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Displaying posts with tag: MySQL 5.6 (reset)
Performance of Inserts on Partitions – MySQL 5.6 v/s MySQL 5.7

Recently, I was discussing with one of my colleagues about how insert statement performs for MySQL partitioned tables. General prediction is that it should be slower than for non-partitioned tables, but how much that we didn’t know. So, I thought let’s test with different types of partitions (i.e range, list and hash) and also with different number of partitions and check how’s performance. As people says, MySQL 5.7 is must faster than old one, so I also tested partitions with it.

So, I took simple table with 3.2M records on Centos 6.7 VM (4 core with 2GB RAM) with default my.cnf settings and then created tables for range, list and hash partitioning with 5,25,50 and 100 partitions. i.e with 5 partition (range and list), the table structures were like

CREATE TABLE emp_range_5(
 id int,
 fname varchar (30),
 lname varchar (30),
 hired_date date not null,
 separated_date date not null,
 job_code int,
 store_id int
 ) …
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Is MySQL X faster than MySQL Y? – Ask queryprofiler

When trying out new software there are many other questions you may ask and one of those is going to be the one above. The answer requires you to have built your software to capture and record low level database metrics and often the focus of application developers is slightly different: they focus on how … Continue reading Is MySQL X faster than MySQL Y? – Ask queryprofiler

Which accounts can access this data?

Knowing which privileges a given account has is easy – just issue SHOW GRANTS FOR user@host.  But what about when you need visibility into privileges from the other direction – which accounts can access specific data?  If you’re a DBA – or perform DBA duties, regardless of your title – you may have been asked this question.  It’s an important question to ask in an audit or compliance review – but it can be a difficult question to answer.    This post will walk through how to assess this, but if you’re impatient and need answers to this question immediately, jump to the end – there’s a simple shortcut.

Things to consider

There are a few things you’ll want to consider about the implementation of the MySQL privilege system as you try to sort out who has access to certain data.

Access type

MySQL can restrict privileges based on operations – somebody who has …

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Practical P_S: Find Client JRE Version Using SQL

MySQL Connector/Java supports connection attributes since version 5.1.25.  This projects useful metadata about the client environment into the database, where MySQL administrators can query PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA tables to remotely survey application deployment environments.  One useful piece of information exposed is the version and vendor of the JVM in use by the client.  This very short blog demonstrates how to get this information from PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA.

The metadata including the Java runtime environment version and vendor can be found in PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA.SESSION_CONNECT_ATTRS table.  Here’s the full contents of that table for a single connection from Connector/Java:

mysql> SELECT *
    -> FROM PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA.SESSION_CONNECT_ATTRS
    -> WHERE processlist_id = 31\G
*************************** 1. row ***************************
  PROCESSLIST_ID: 31
       ATTR_NAME: _runtime_version
      ATTR_VALUE: …
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State of Percona Server 5.6, MySQL 5.6 and MySQL 5.7 RC

This week Oracle will release MySQL 5.7 GA, so it’s a perfect time to do a quick review of the current state of Percona Server 5.6.26, MySQL 5.6.26 and MySQL-5.7.8 RC. We used two boxes from our benchmark lab for this:
– Box 1: 16 Cores+HT (32 virt cores)/fast PCIe ssd card/RAM: 192GB
– Box 2: 24 Cores+HT(48 virt cores)/fast PCIe ssd card/RAM: 128GB

Dataset: sysbench/uniform, 32 tables with 12M rows each, ~95GB
Tests: sysbench – point select, oltp read only, oltp read/write
Test sequence: start server, warmup, series of the tests (each lasts 5 minutes) from 1 to 4096 threads

Tests were run for two setups:
– CPU bound (in memory) – innodb_buffer_pool_size=100GB
– IO bound – innodb_buffer_pool_size=25GB

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Do not run those commands with MariaDB GTIDs - part # 2

Update 2016-01-30: restarting the IO_THREAD might be considered useful in some situations (avoiding MDEV-9138).  Look for "in contrast, if the IO thread was also stopped first" in MDEV-6589 for more information.

In a previous post, I listed some sequences of commands that you should not run on a MariaDB slave that is lagging and which is using the GTID protocol.  Those are the following (do not

Create MySQL Index

Indexes are separate data structures that provide alternate pathways to finding data. They can and do generally speed up the processing of queries and other DML commands, like the INSERT, UPDATE, REPLACE INTO, and DELETE statements. Indexes are also called fast access paths.

In the scope of the InnoDB Database Engine, the MySQL database maintains the integrity of indexes after you create them. The upside of indexes is that they can improve SQL statement performance. The downside is that they impose overhead on every INSERT, UPDATE, REPLACE INTO, and DELETE statement, because the database maintains them by inserting, updating, or deleting items for each related change in the tables that the indexes support.

Indexes have two key properties—usability and visibility. Indexes are both usable and visible by default. That means they …

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Unexpected Memory Consumption for Bulk Index Creation in InnoDB (MySQL)

In my last Booking.com Hackathon, I worked on MyISAM vs InnoDB for data loading (LOAD DATA IN FILE) and bulk index creation.  My motivation was the following: knowing that some are still using MyISAM for this particular use-case, I wanted to verify/understand if/why InnoDB is slower than MyISAM.  I do not yet have complete results on this specific subject but I found some interesting things that

Advanced Query Tuning in MySQL 5.6 and MySQL 5.7 Webinar: Q&A

Thank you for attending my July 22 webinar titled “Advanced Query Tuning in MySQL 5.6 and 5.7” (my slides and a replay available here). As promised here is the list of questions and my answers (thank you for your great questions).

Q: Here is the explain example:

mysql> explain extended select id, site_id from test_index_id where site_id=1
*************************** 1. row ***************************
           id: 1
  select_type: SIMPLE
        table: test_index_id
         type: ref
possible_keys: key_site_id
          key: key_site_id
      key_len: 5
          ref: const
         rows: 1
     filtered: 100.00
        Extra: Using where; Using index

why is site_id a covered index for the query, given the fact that a) we are selecting “id”, b) key_site_id only …

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How much could you benefit from MySQL 5.6 parallel replication?

I have heard this question quite often: “At busy times, our replicas start lagging quite frequently. We are using N schemas, so which performance boost could we expect from MySQL 5.6 parallel replication?” Here is a quick way to give you a rough estimate of the potential benefit.

General idea

In MySQL 5.6, parallelism is added at the schema level. So in theory, if you have N schemas and if you use N parallel threads, replication could be up to N times faster. This assumes at least 2 things:

  • Replication throughput scales linearly with the number of parallel threads.
  • Writes are evenly distributed across schemas.

Both assumptions are of course not realistic. But it is easy to know the distribution of writes, and that can already give you an idea about how much you could benefit from parallel replication.

Writes are stored in binary logs but it is much easier to work with the …

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