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Displaying posts with tag: secondary index (reset)
Efficient Use of Indexes in MySQL

The slides of “Efficient Use of Indexes in MySQL” talk we delivered on SFMySQL Meetup.

This is an introductory talk for developers on MySQL indexes. In my opinion it’s quite important to understand how InnoDB organizes data. If you know how MySQL accesses data it’s easier to write optimal queries.

When working with queries I imagine secondary indexes as a table with records sorted by secondary key fields. This is a powerful concept that helps to understand MySQL logic. It’s also easy to understand complex optimizations like loose index scan.

For example, for index (last_name, rank) the secondary index table looks like:

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Secondary Indexes on XML BLOBs in MySQL 5.7

When storing XML documents in a BLOB or TEXT column there was no way to create indexes on individual XML elements or attributes. With the new auto generated columns in MySQL 5.7 (1st Release Candidate available now!) this has changed! Let me give you an example. Let's work on the following table:

 mysql> SELECT * FROM country\G  
*************************** 1. row ***************************
docid: 1
doc: <country>
<name>Germany</name>
<population>82164700</population>
<surface>357022.00</surface>
<city name="Berlin"><population></population></city>
<city …
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InnoDB Primary Key versus Secondary Index: An Interesting Lesson from EXPLAIN

I ran into an interesting issue today, while examining some EXPLAIN outputs, and wanted to share the findings, as some of this is undocumented.

Basically, you can start with a very simple InnoDB table - 2 INT columns, Primary Key (PK) on the 1st column, regular index on the 2nd:

CREATE TABLE `t1` (
  `id1` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `id2` int(10) unsigned DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id1`),
  KEY `id2` (`id2`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

The query is:

SELECT id1 FROM t1;

This is a straight-forward query with no WHERE clause.

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InnoDB Primary Key versus Secondary Index: An Interesting Lesson from EXPLAIN

I ran into an interesting issue today, while examining some EXPLAIN outputs, and wanted to share the findings, as some of this is undocumented.

Basically, you can start with a very simple InnoDB table – 2 INT columns, Primary Key (PK) on the 1st column, regular index on the 2nd:

CREATE TABLE `t1` (
  `id1` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `id2` int(10) unsigned DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id1`),
  KEY `id2` (`id2`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

The query is:

SELECT id1 FROM t1;

This is a straight-forward query with no WHERE clause.

Given no WHERE clause, we know there will be a full table or index scan. Let’s look at EXPLAIN:

mysql> EXPLAIN SELECT id1 FROM t1\G
*************************** 1. row ***************************
           id: 1
  select_type: SIMPLE
        table: t1
         type: index
possible_keys: NULL
          key: id2
      key_len: 5
          ref: NULL
         rows: 1 …
[Read more]
Slides of my talk on B+Tree Indexes and InnoDB

The slides of my talk on B+Tree Indexes and InnoDB are now available for download. This slide was presented during Percona Live London 2011. You can download the slides from here.
There are many other interesting and informative talks that were presented during Percona Live London 2011, and I think you should definitely check them out, if you haven't. They are available here.

The post Slides of my talk on B+Tree Indexes and InnoDB appeared first on ovais.tariq.

A few notes on InnoDB PRIMARY KEY

InnoDB uses an index-organized data storage technique, wherein the primary key acts as the clustered index and this clustered index holds the data. Its for this reason that understanding the basics of InnoDB primary key is very important, and hence the need for these notes.

Understanding InnoDB clustered indexes

Some people don't probably know, but there is a difference between how indexes work in MyISAM and how they work in InnoDB, particularly when talking from the point of view of performance enhancement. Now since, InnoDB is starting to be widely used, it is important we understand how indexing works in InnoDB. Hence, the reason for this post!

Showing entries 1 to 7