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Displaying posts with tag: semi-sync replication (reset)
Semi-Sync replication performance in MySQL 5.7.4 DMR

I was interested to hear about semi-sync replication improvements in MySQL’s 5.7.4 DMR release and decided to check it out.  I previously blogged about poor semi-sync performance and was pretty disappointed from semi-sync’s performance across WAN distances back then, particularly with many client threads.

The Test

The basic environment of these tests was:

  • AWS EC2 m3.medium instances
  • Master in us-east-1, slave in us-west-1 (~78ms ping RTT)
  • CentOS 6.5
  • innodb_flush_log_at_trx_commit=1
  • sync_binlog=1
  • Semi-sync replication plugin installed and enabled.
  • GTID’s enabled (except on 5.5)
  • sysbench 0.5 update_index.lua test, 60 seconds, 250k table size.
  • MySQL 5.7 was …
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Multi-master and read slaves using Severalnines

This blog post shows how you can use the Severalnines Configurator for MySQL Replication to deploy a Multi-master replication setup, and install ClusterControl.
You can also watch videos showing what is described below or read an even more detailed tutorial.

When the deployment is finished you have a set of tools to manage and monitor replication, as well as to add new slaves, and to perform failover.
You can choose:

  • The number of slaves you wish to connect to the …
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Setting up Multi-master and read slaves using Severalnines




Read the detailed replication tutorial instead.


This tutorial shows how you can use the Severalnines Configurator for MySQL Replication to deploy a Multi-master replication setup, and install ClusterControl.

When the deployment is finished you have a set of tools to manage and monitor replication, as well as to add new slaves, and to perform failover.
You can choose:

  • if you wish also setup bi-directional replication between the masters
  • the number of …
[Read more]
Semi-sync replication (5.5)

A bit unorthodox, I normally just write about MySQL Cluster here, but I just wanted to understand how much latency semi-sync replication adds.

The test was very simple:

  • two mysql servers, interconnected (same switch) on a 1 Gig-E network
  • one table (see below)
  • comparing insert performance (one thread) with 'no replication at all' and 'semi sync replication enabled'.
  • bencher (had to hack it a bit to make it work with vanilla mysql) running one thread, inserting 4B+128B+4B = 136B of data
CREATE TABLE `t1` (
`id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`data` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
`ts` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
KEY `ts` (`ts`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB

Test 1 - no replication

src/bencher -t1 -r 30   -q "insert into t1(b) …
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Showing entries 1 to 4