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Displaying posts with tag: Insight for DBAs (reset)
mysqld_multi: How to run multiple instances of MySQL

The need to have multiple instances of MySQL (the well-known mysqld process) running in the same server concurrently in a transparent way, instead of having them executed in separate containers/virtual machines, is not very common. Yet from time to time the Percona Support team receives a request from a customer to assist in the configuration of such an environment. MySQL provides a tool to facilitate the execution of multiple instances called mysqld_multi:

“mysqld_multi is designed to manage several mysqld processes that listen for connections on different Unix socket files and TCP/IP ports. It can start or stop servers, or report their current status.”

For tests and development purposes, …

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When (and how) to move an InnoDB table outside the shared tablespace

In my last post, “A closer look at the MySQL ibdata1 disk space issue and big tables,” I looked at the growing ibdata1 problem under the perspective of having big tables residing inside the so-called shared tablespace. In the particular case that motivated that post, we had a customer running out of disk space in his server who was looking for a way to make the ibdata1 file shrink. As you may know, that file (or, as explained there, the set of ibdata files composing the shared tablespace) stores all InnoDB tables created when innodb_file_per_table is disabled, but also other InnoDB structures, such as undo logs and data dictionary.

For example, when you run a transaction involving InnoDB tables, MySQL will first write all the changes it triggers in an undo log, for the case you later …

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When (and how) to move an InnoDB table outside the shared tablespace

In my last post, “A closer look at the MySQL ibdata1 disk space issue and big tables,” I looked at the growing ibdata1 problem under the perspective of having big tables residing inside the so-called shared tablespace. In the particular case that motivated that post, we had a customer running out of disk space in his server who was looking for a way to make the ibdata1 file shrink. As you may know, that file (or, as explained there, the set of ibdata files composing the shared tablespace) stores all InnoDB tables created when innodb_file_per_table is disabled, but also other InnoDB structures, such as undo logs and data dictionary.

For example, when you run a transaction involving InnoDB tables, MySQL will first write all the changes it triggers in an undo log, for the case you later decide to …

[Read more]
A closer look at the MySQL ibdata1 disk space issue and big tables

A recurring and very common customer issue seen here at the Percona Support team involves how to make the ibdata1 file “shrink” within MySQL. I can only imagine there’s a degree of regret by some of the InnoDB architects on their design decisions regarding disk-space management by the shared tablespace* because this has been a big frustration for many MySQL users over the years.

There’s a very old bug (“InnoDB ibdata1 never shrinks after data is removed,” Sept. 8 2003) documenting user dissatisfaction. Shortly before that issue celebrated its 10th anniversary, James Day, MySQL senior principal support engineer at Oracle, posted a comment explaining why things haven’t changed and he also offered possible alternative solutions. Maybe we’ll …

[Read more]
A closer look at the MySQL ibdata1 disk space issue and big tables

A recurring and very common customer issue seen here at the Percona Support team involves how to make the ibdata1 file “shrink” within MySQL. I can only imagine there’s a degree of regret by some of the InnoDB architects on their design decisions regarding disk-space management by the shared tablespace* because this has been a big frustration for many MySQL users over the years.

There’s a very old bug (“InnoDB ibdata1 never shrinks after data is removed,” Sept. 8 2003) documenting user dissatisfaction. Shortly before that issue celebrated its 10th anniversary, James Day, MySQL senior principal support engineer at Oracle, posted a comment explaining why things haven’t changed and he also offered possible alternative solutions. Maybe we’ll …

[Read more]
How to use MySQL Global Transaction IDs (GTIDs) in production

Reconfiguring replication has always been a challenge with MySQL. Each time the replication topology has to be changed, the process is tedious and error-prone because finding the correct binlog position is not straightforward at all. Global Transaction IDs (GTIDs) introduced in MySQL 5.6 aim at solving this annoying issue.

The idea is quite simple: each transaction is associated with a unique identifier shared by all servers in a given replication topology. Now reconfiguring replication is easy as the correct binlog position can be automatically calculated by the server.

Awesome? Yes it is! However GTIDs are also changing a lot of things in how we can perform operations on replication. For instance, skipping transactions is a bit more difficult. Or you can get bitten by …

[Read more]
How to use MySQL Global Transaction IDs (GTIDs) in production

Reconfiguring replication has always been a challenge with MySQL. Each time the replication topology has to be changed, the process is tedious and error-prone because finding the correct binlog position is not straightforward at all. Global Transaction IDs (GTIDs) introduced in MySQL 5.6 aim at solving this annoying issue.

The idea is quite simple: each transaction is associated with a unique identifier shared by all servers in a given replication topology. Now reconfiguring replication is easy as the correct binlog position can be automatically calculated by the server.

Awesome? Yes it is! However GTIDs are also changing a lot of things in how we can perform operations on replication. For instance, skipping transactions is a bit more difficult. Or you can get bitten by …

[Read more]
5 great new features from Percona Cloud Tools for MySQL

It’s been three months since we announced anything for Percona Cloud Tools, not because we’ve been idle but because we’ve been so busy the time flew by!  Here’s the TL;DR to pique your interest:

  • EXPLAIN queries in real-time through the web app
  • Query Analytics for Performance Schema
  • Dashboards: customizable, shared groups of charts
  • Install and upgrade the agent with 1 command line
  • Unified UI: same time range, same host wherever you go

Percona Cloud Tools for MySQL is a hosted service providing access to query performance insights for all MySQL uses. After a brief setup, unlock new information about your database and how to improve your applications. There’s a lot more, but let’s just look at these five new features…

 

EXPLAIN queries in real-time through the web app

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Measuring failover time for ScaleArc load balancer

ScaleArc hired Percona to benchmark failover times for the ScaleArc database traffic management software in different scenarios. We tested failover times for various clustered setups, where ScaleArc itself was the load balancer for the cluster. These tests complement other performance tests on the ScaleArc software – sysbench testing for latency and testing for WordPress acceleration.

We tested failover times for Percona XtraDB Cluster (PXC) and MHA (any traditional MySQL replication-based solution works pretty much the same way).

In each case, we tested failover with a rate limited …

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Make a difference! See the world! Speak at Percona Live London; Santa Clara!

Twice each year members of the global open-source community converge on London in November and Santa Clara in April to network with, and learn from, some of the world’s most experienced and accomplished system architects, developers and DBAs.

And now it’s time for YOU to give back to this diverse and growing MySQL community. The Call for Speakers for Percona Live London (Nov. 3-4) closes Aug. 17 and the deadline for submitting talks for the ever-growing Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo (April 13-16, 2015) expires Nov. 9.

If you like putting things off until the last minute, then it’s time to get to work! Aug. 17 is just two days away and November will be here before you know it (think of how fast summer has gone by already).

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