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MySQL 8.0 (dev): what to look for

This is an unstable release, please don’t use in production.

It was rumored that the new MySQL version would be 8 and not as 5.8 as a lot of people thought, and it appears the rumors were true.

Below are some of the features that caught my eye at first glance:

Roles

Although password expiration was implemented 5.7, the newer version bring a set of collective privileges as a Role. No need to have to copy paste that massive GRANT command you had when creating new users.

UTF-8 as default Charset

This is not yet the default charset coming with the server, but utf8mb4 will be the main charset instead of latin1, and the default collation will change from latin1_swedish_ci to utf8mb4_800_ci_ai. The plan is to do that before General Availability.

Invisible Indexes

Giving an …

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MySQL 8.0 - auto increment feature gets fixed

How InnoDB initializes AUTO_INCREMENT counters is actually not a bug, but a documented mechanism. There were some complaints and even people who lost data over this. To initialize an auto-increment counter after a server restart, InnoDB executes the equivalent of the following statement on the first insert into a table containing an AUTO_INCREMENT column. SELECT MAX(ai_col) FROM table_name FOR

Visualizing the MySQL Bug Tide

On the MySQL Bugs website there are some tide stats available. These show rate of bug creation.

I've put them in a graph:
I made these with this IPython Notebook. There are more detailed graphs per version in the notebook.

Update: The version in the notebook now uses the same range for the Y axis and has a marker for the GA dates of each release.

MySQL DATETIME VS TIMESTAMP

A question which would come sometimes to mind when starting with MySQL is whether I should use DATETIME or TIMESTAMP data type since both appear to store same date and time component.


Similarities between datetime and timestamp:
1. Values contain both date and time parts.
2. Format of retrieval and display is "YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS".
3. Can include a trailing fractional seconds part in up to microseconds (6 digits) precision.
4. With the fractional part included, the format for these values is "YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS[.fraction]".
5. Both the TIMESTAMP and (as of MySQL 5.6.5) DATETIME offer automatic initialization and updating to the current date and time.

But both differ in some ways as mentioned below:

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Is Your MariaDB Version Affected by the Remote Root Code Execution Vulnerability CVE-2016-6662?

Wed, 2016-09-14 00:00

MySQL CDC, Streaming Binary Logs and Asynchronous Triggers

In this post, we’ll look at MySQL CDC, streaming binary logs and asynchronous triggers.

What is Change Data Capture and why do we need it?

Change Data Capture (CDC) tracks data changes (usually close to realtime). In MySQL, the easiest and probably most efficient way to track data changes is to use binary logs. However, other approaches exist. For example:

  • General log or Audit Log Plugin (which logs all queries, not just the changes)
  • MySQL triggers (not recommended, as it can slow down the application — more below)

One of the first implementations of CDC for …

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ProxySQL and MHA Integration

This blog post discusses ProxySQL and MHA integration, and how they work together.

MHA (Master High Availability Manager and tools for MySQL) is almost fully integrated with the ProxySQL process. This means you can count on the MHA standard feature to manage failover, and ProxySQL to manage the traffic and shift from one server to another.

This is one of the main differences between MHA and VIP, and MHA and ProxySQL: with MHA/ProxySQL, there is no need to move IPs or re-define DNS.

The following is an example of an MHA configuration file for use with ProxySQL:

server default]
    user=mha
    password=mha
    ssh_user=root
    repl_password=replica
    manager_log=/tmp/mha.log
    manager_workdir=/tmp
    remote_workdir=/tmp
    master_binlog_dir=/opt/mysql_instances/mha1/logs …
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MySQL 8.0: Improvements to Information_schema

Coinciding with the new native data dictionary in MySQL 8.0, we have made a number of useful enhancements to our INFORMATION_SCHEMA subsystem design in MySQL 8.0. In this post I will first go through our legacy implementation as it has stood since MySQL 5.1, and then cover what’s changed.…

Sign up for Part 2 of the MySQL Query Tuning Webinar Trilogy: Indexing & EXPLAIN

When it comes to the query tuning, EXPLAIN is one the most important tools in the DBA’s arsenal. Why is a given query slow, what does the execution plan look like, how will JOINs be processed, is the query using the correct indexes, or is it creating a temporary table?

You can now sign up for the webinar, which takes place at the end of this month on September 27th. We’ll look at the EXPLAIN command and see how it can help us answer these questions.

We will also look into how to use database indexes to speed up queries. More specifically, we’ll cover the different index types such as B-Tree, Fulltext and Hash, deepdive into B-Tree indexes, and discuss the indexes for MyISAM vs. InnoDB tables as well as some gotchas.

MySQL Query Tuning Trilogy: Indexing and …

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MySQL 8.0: Invisible Indexes

Invisible indexes are a new feature in MySQL 8.0 that provide the ability to mark an index as unavailable for use by the Optimizer. This means that the index will still be maintained and kept up-to-date as data is modified, but no queries will be permitted to make use of the index (even if the query uses a FORCE INDEX hint).…

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