Home |  MySQL Buzz |  FAQ |  Feeds |  Submit your blog feed |  Feedback |  Archive |  Aggregate feed RSS 2.0 English Deutsch Español Français Italiano 日本語 Русский Português 中文
Previous 30 Newer Entries Showing entries 61 to 90 of 181 Next 30 Older Entries

Displaying posts with tag: memcached (reset)

MySQL Conference, Day 2
+1 Vote Up -0Vote Down
While waiting in the line for a breakfast table, I found Reggie Burnett, who is still with MySQL now Oracle. We shared a table and talking about Android and the future of handhelds.

I missed the keynotes by Edward Screven and by Tim O'Reilly. Instead I had scheduled interviews with The 451 Group and then with Robert Scoble. Those both went really well. And I learned that the Screven speech went not so well, which would have been amusing, but not a good use of time.

The rest of the day, so far, has consisted of meeting people, spending time at the Memcached.org booth and the Gear6 booth, and doing more scheduled tech press interviews. Sarah Novotny showed up during the nosh and free beer, right



  [Read more...]
Reacting to "Memcached is not a store"
+0 Vote Up -1Vote Down
I keep seeing "Memcached is not a key value store. It is a cache. Hence the name." This is strongly reinforced by statements made in the memcached mailing list itself.

This is short sighted.

Memcached is a number of things. It is an idea (fast key value store, with distributed hash function scaling), it is a network protocol (two of them, in fact), it is a selection of client libraries and APIs (most based on libmemcached), and it is a server implementation. In fact, now, is is now a number of server implementations, because now there are a number of different things that implement the memcached protocol.

Only one of which is the open source community edition of the memcached server, version 1.4, downloadable from http://memcached.org/

Despite what you may get told, especially on the memcached







  [Read more...]
MySQL+Memcached is still the workhorse
+0 Vote Up -0Vote Down
(originally posted at the Gear6 corporate blog: MySQL+Memcached is still the workhorse.  Please comment there.)

Because I'm becoming known as someone who knows something about "this whole NoSQL thing", people have started asking me to take a look at some of their systems or ideas, and tell them which NoSQL technology they should use.

To be fair, it is a confusing space right now, there are a LOT of NoSQL technologies showing up, and there is a lot of buzz from the tech press, and in blogs and on twitter.  Most of that buzz is, frankly, ignorant and uninformed, and is being written by people who do not have enough experience running live systems.

A couple of times already, someone has described an application or concept to me, and asked "So, should I use Cassandra, or CouchDB, or what?"







  [Read more...]
Libmemcached 0.38 Release
+0 Vote Up -0Vote Down
From the Changelog:

  • C++ interface for libhashkit.
  • Modified memcached_set_memory_allocators() so that it requires a context pointer.
  • memcached_clone() now runs 5 times faster.
  • Functions used for callbacks are now given const memcached_st.
  • Added MEMCACHED_BEHAVIOR_CORK.
  • memslap now creates a configuration file at ~/.memslap.cnf
  • memcached_purge() now calls any callbacks registered during get execution.
  • Many fixes to memslap.
  • Updates for memcapable.
  • Compile fixes for OpenBSD.
  • Fix for possible recursive decent on IO failure.

    Possibly the most exciting piece is the performance wins for memcached_clone(). In a lot of situations developers use libmemcached with Apache. Each time an Apache process has to be created a clone() call is made (in some PHP architectures this happens with each













  •   [Read more...]
    10x Performance Improvements in MySQL – A Case Study
    +1 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    The slides for my presentation at FOSDEM 2010 are now available online at slideshare. In this presentation I describe a successful client implementation with the result of 10x performance improvements. My presentation covers monitoring, reviewing and analyzing SQL, the art of indexes, improving SQL, storage engines and caching.

    The end result was a page load improvement from 700+ms load time to a a consistent 60ms.

    10x Performance Improvements – A Case Study View more presentations from Ronald Bradford.
    Using ini files for PHP application settings
    +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down
    At dealnews we have three tiers of servers. First is our development servers, then staging and finally production. The complexity of the environment increases at each level. On a development server, everything runs on the localhost: mysql, memcached, etc. At the staging level, there is a dedicated MySQL server. In production, it gets quite wild with redundant services and two data centers.

    One of the challenges of this is where and how to store the connection information for all these services. We have done several things in the past. The most common thing is to store this information in a PHP file. It may be per server or there could be one big file like:

    <?php

    if(DEV){
        $server = "localhost";
    } else {
        $server = "10.1.1.25";
    }

    ?>











      [Read more...]
    Active Cache for MySQL
    +1 Vote Up -1Vote Down

    One of the problems I have with Memcache is this cache is passive, this means it only stores cached data. This means application using Memcache has to has to special logic to handle misses from the cache, being careful updating the cache - you may have multiple data modifications happening at the same time. Finally you have to pay with increased latency constructing the items expired from the cache, while they could have been refreshed in the background. I think all of these problems could be solved with concept of active cache

    The idea with Active Cache is very simple - for any data retrieval operation cache would actually know how to construct the object, so you will never get a miss from the cache, unless there is an error. From existing tools this probably lies out best on registering the jobs with Gearman.

    The updates of the data in this case should go

      [Read more...]
    Catching up with Mark Atwood on memcached
    Employee +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down
    I had an opportunity to catch up with Mark Atwood last week to discuss his new role at Gear6 and some of the interesting developments currently going on around memcached, including Gearman integration and its suitability for cloud computing environments.




    memcached and the client: Database UDFs
    +1 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    NorthScale's own Patrick Galbraith has, for many years now, authored and maintained the MySQL, and now Drizzle, UDFs for memcached.  Last week, Patrick took this one step further with the latest release, version 1.1, which now includes support for "check and set" (a.k.a. CAS) operations.  

    User Defined Functions are available for a number of different databases.  This allows some kind of stored procedure language or other triggers to execute other code imported into the DB.  In the case of the memcached UDF, this means giving stored procedures the ability to call memcached operations.

    The general idea here is pretty simple.  Most applications start with a database, though it's always possible to use web services or flat files.  Regardless of where the data is

      [Read more...]
    MySQL University: Memcached Functions for MySQL
    Employee +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    This Thursday (November 19th, 14:00 UTC), Patrick Galbraith will present memcached Functions for MySQL (UDFs). This session is about a suite of functions available to use with MySQL that allow you to store, retrieve and delete data, as well as most of the functions and operations that are available with libmemcached, such as server connectivity to the client, server status, client behaviors, and more. You can combine the fetching of data from one or more tables with the fetching of data from memcached and be able to apply any SQL operations on that result set such as LIMIT, sorting and other conditional operations.

    For MySQL University sessions,

      [Read more...]
    MySQL University: Memcached Functions for MySQL
    Employee +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    This Thursday (November 19th, 14:00 UTC), Patrick Galbraith will present memcached Functions for MySQL (UDFs). This session is about a suite of functions available to use with MySQL that allow you to store, retrieve and delete data, as well as most of the functions and operations that are available with libmemcached, such as server connectivity to the client, server status, client behaviors, and more. You can combine the fetching of data from one or more tables with the fetching of data from memcached and be able to apply any SQL operations on that result set such as LIMIT, sorting and other conditional operations.

    For MySQL University

      [Read more...]
    MySQL University: Memcached Functions for MySQL
    Employee +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    This Thursday (November 19th, 14:00 UTC), Patrick Galbraith will present memcached Functions for MySQL (UDFs). This session is about a suite of functions available to use with MySQL that allow you to store, retrieve and delete data, as well as most of the functions and operations that are available with libmemcached, such as server connectivity to the client, server status, client behaviors, and more. You can combine the fetching of data from one or more tables with the fetching of data from memcached and be able to apply any SQL operations on that result set such as LIMIT, sorting and other conditional operations.

    For MySQL University

      [Read more...]
    MySQL scalability: diagnostic for beginners
    Employee +1 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    This past week I have been working with 2 Web2.0 startups - members of Sun Startup Essentials, they get the support for free - that are looking at improving the response time of their web site.

    We've been working at understanding how they servers behave today and what could prevent their application to scale, which led me to show how to run a quick diagnostic on an existing system and to restate some key fundamentals in terms of scalability.

    Let's start by the fundamentals.

    Any piece of software is nothing else than a set of instructions that need 2 things: computing units to execute on, and a fast access to data.

    Computing units are available in the form of a hardware threads located on a processor. The number of threads that a server makes available to

      [Read more...]
    MySQL scalability: diagnostic for beginners
    Employee +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    This past week I have been working with 2 Web2.0 startups - members of Sun Startup Essentials, they get the support for free - that are looking at improving the response time of their web site.

    We've been working at understanding how they servers behave today and what could prevent their application to scale, which led me to show how to run a quick diagnostic on an existing system and to restate some key fundamentals in terms of scalability.

    Let's start by the fundamentals.

    Any piece of software is nothing else than a set of instructions that need 2 things: computing units to execute on, and a fast access to data.

    Computing units are available in the form of a hardware threads located on a processor. The number of threads that a server makes available

      [Read more...]
    MySQL scalability: diagnostic for beginners
    Employee +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    This past week I have been working with 2 Web2.0 startups - members of Sun Startup Essentials, they get the support for free - that are looking at improving the response time of their web site.

    We've been working at understanding how they servers behave today and what could prevent their application to scale, which led me to show how to run a quick diagnostic on an existing system and to restate some key fundamentals in terms of scalability.

    Let's start by the fundamentals.

    Any piece of software is nothing else than a set of instructions that need 2 things: computing units to execute on, and a fast access to data.

    Computing units are available in the form of a hardware threads located on a processor. The number of threads that a server makes available

      [Read more...]
    Memcached Functions For MySQL 1.1 Released
    +1 Vote Up -0Vote Down
    I'm pleased to announce the release of Memcached Functions for MySQL version 1.1. I realized in the past few weeks, while writing my latest book "Expert PHP and MySQL", that there was no way to obtain the CAS value of a cached item in order to successfully use the function memc_cas(). So, I decided to create a new function, memc_get_cas(), which obtains the CAS value for an item so you can subsequently use this value in a memc_cas() call, which is shown in the example below:

    mysql> select memc_get_cas('t1');
    +--------------------+
    | memc_get_cas('t1') |
    +--------------------+
    |                  3 | 
    +--------------------+
    1 row in set (0.00 sec)
    
    mysql> select memc_get('t1');
    +----------------+
    | memc_get('t1') |
    +----------------+
    | new value      |


      [Read more...]
    451 CAOS Links 2009.11.13
    +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    Symbian’s future in the balance? All Go for Chrome OS. And more.

    Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca
    “Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

    For the latest on Oracle’s acquisition of MySQL via Sun, see Everything you always wanted to know about MySQL but were afraid to ask

    Symbian’s future in the balance?
    The H reported that Samsung is to abandon Symbian in favour of Windows Mobile, Android and the new Samsung bada OS, while Samsung later denied that it


      [Read more...]
    Free Webinar: Memcached and MySQL for Rapidly Scaling High Traffic Websites
    Employee +1 Vote Up -0Vote Down
    For those interested in learning "how it gets done", Raj Narayan - Director of Operations at Glam Media will be talking about how they evolved their infrastructure in route to becoming the 2nd fastest growing US-based web property in 2008. MySQL and Memcached proved to be critical pieces of infrastructure and continue to serve nearly half a billion hits per day. This is a free webinar taking place Thursday, November 12, 2009: 10:00 Pacific time (America) hosted by MySQL and Gear6, register here (http://www.mysql.com/news-and-events/web-seminars/display-458.html).
    More memcached
    +0 Vote Up -1Vote Down

    Our intrepid NorthScalers have been doing some interesting work recently in memcached land...

    Last week, Dustin Sallings announced his memcached server implementation in Erlang, called EMemcached.  Besides being a cool project, there's a surprising amount of interest in the mixture of memcached and Erlang, as you can see from the comments on Dustin's announcement post.

    Today, Patrick Galbraith announced that the memcached UDF's are now integrated into the Drizzle project's mainline.  Drizzle is an interesting fork of MySQL and these memcached UDF's (which

      [Read more...]
    memcached Functions for Drizzle now in main tree!
    +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down
    What a great day! I see that the drizzle team has merged in my (and Padraig O'Sullivan's) memcached Functions for Drizzle (UDFs). I'm really glad to have this in drizzle now as it adds a means of interacting with memcached from within Drizzle. I have most functions from the MySQL branch implemented now as well. I'm extremely grateful to Padraig O'Sullivan for getting this project off the ground. I was a bit stuck with the new API and C++ when I first attempted these and he designed the class setup and had the major functions working which I then picked up and added more functions as well as tests. I was also glad to have the drizzle team add in my sleep() UDF which allowed me to test expirations in these memcached functions.

    These functions have some similar, but very little code from the memcached Functions for MySQL. The new UDF API is completely different than MySQL's UDF API. You have to

      [Read more...]
    MySQL-Memcached or NOSQL Tokyo Tyrant – part 2
    +1 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    Part 1 of our series set-up our "test"  application and looked at boosting performance of the application by buffer MySQL with memcached.  Our test application is simple and requires only 3 basic operations per transaction 2 reads and 1 write.  Using memcached combined with MySQL we ended up nearly getting a 10X performance boost from the application.  Now we are going to look at what we could achieve if we did not have to write to the database at all.  So let's look at what happens if we push everything including writes into memcached.

    Wow that's shockingly fast isn't it! I guess being completely in memory helps for this app.  What is

      [Read more...]
    MySQL-Memcached or NOSQL Tokyo Tyrant – part 1
    +2 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    All to often people force themselves into using a database like MySQL with no thought into whether if its the best solution to there problem. Why?  Because their other applications use it, so why not the new application?  Over the past couple of months I have been doing a ton of work for clients who use their database like most people use memcached .  Lookup a row based on a key, update the data in the row, stuff the row back in the database.  Rinse and repeat.  Sure these setups vary sometimes, throwing in a “lookup” via username, or even the rare count.  But for the most part they are designed to be simple.

    A classic example is a simple online game.  An online game may only require that an application retrieve a single record from the database.  The record may contain all the vital stats for the game, be updated and stuffed back into

      [Read more...]
    NoSQL options
    +1 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    The NoSQL event in New York had a number of presentations on non relational technologies including of Hadoop, MongoDB and CouchDB.

    Coming historically from a relational background of 20 years with Ingres, Oracle and MySQL (http://mysql.com) I have been moving my focus towards non relational data store. The most obvious and well used today is memcached, a non persistent distributed key/value pair store. There are a number of persistent key/value stores in the marketplace, Tokyo Cabinet, Project Voldemort and Redis to name a

      [Read more...]
    Observations on key-value databases
    +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    Key-value databases are catching fire these days. Memcached, Redis, Cassandra, Keyspace, Tokyo Tyrant, and a handful of others are surging in popularity, judging by the contents of my feed reader.

    I find a number of things interesting about these tools.

    • There are many more of them than open-source traditional relational databases. (edit: I mean that there are many options that all seem similar to each other, instead of 3 or 4 standing out as the giants.)
    • It seems that a lot of people are simultaneously inventing solutions to their problems in private without being aware of each other, then open-sourcing the results. That points to a sudden sea change in architectures. Tipping points tend to be abrupt, which would explain isolated redundant development.
    • Many of the products are feature-rich with things programmers need: diverse
      [Read more...]
    Having fun with Tokyo Tyrant
    +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down
    I decided to thee other day to investigate using Tokyo Tyrant because I was interested in the fact it has a memcached protocol and I wanted to get a feel for how it works with my memcached functions for MySQL (UDF). Matt Ingenthron came up with a good term recently: Mem-capable, which Tokyo Tyrant is. I find any key/value storage to be of great interest, particularly those that you simply change the port your memcached client is connecting and simply use it the same way you would memcached.

    So, just what is Tokyo Tyrant?

    Tokyo Tyrant is a database server, written by Mikio Hirabayashi, for Tokyo Cabinet. It provides for concurrent remote connections to Tokyo Cabinet . It provides its own binary protocol as well as a memcached and HTTP compatibility protocols. It also has C, Perl, PHP, Java, Erlang, Python and Ruby bindings. Other features Tokyo Tyrant offers:

    * Hot backup and





      [Read more...]
    Solaris On Demand for Sun Partners
    Employee +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    You are an Independent Software Vendor, and you want to develop, port, or test your application on Solaris or OpenSolaris? Sun's online Virtual Lab environment - EZQual - makes it easy for you, and it's free!

    The Lab features pre-installed SPARC or x86 processor-based Sun servers with development tools (SunStudio and Netbeans), Java, AMP, memcached, Squid, Httplight, PostgreSQL, Solaris or OpenSolaris, and more.

    In addition, thanks to the Sun's Secure Global Desktop, accessing this secure development environment over the Internet is just like running Solaris on your own laptop:

    Want to know more? Check out the EZQual web page.

    memcached talk tonight, ManadLUG
    +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down
    I have a talk scheduled tonight, for anyone who's in the Southern New Hampshire area (or greater Northern New England area): http://permalink.gmane.org/gmane.org.user-groups.linux.gnhlug.announce/743

    I'll be going over a number of things, time permitting:

    * memcached (in general)
    * NorthScale's memcached Amazon Machine Images and Virtual Appliance
    * moxi - memcached proxy
    * memcached Functions for MySQL

    I'll run a couple demonstrations with each, first simple memcached usage, then using two memcached instances through moxi, then I'll throw in using them with the UDFs.

    I intend to see if the Boston MySQL Users Group would be interested in this talk soon as well.
    Memcached Functions for MySQL and Moxi: a great combination
    +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down
    Working at Northscale has been a lot of great fun lately! I have finally figured out how to get puppet to set up a stock Amazon instance with everything we need and have been impressed with how you can automate system setup with puppet. I remember when I worked at Grazr how much of a hassle it was for us to have to rebuild systems. Something like Puppet would have been a godsend.

    Today I though I would post about how cool moxi is. If you don't know, moxi is a memcached proxy (http://labs.northscale.com/moxi/) which allows you to move any complexity of having to set up the list of memcached servers you are using. Also, moxi has some great features such as:

    * De-duplication of requests for popular keys
    * A front cache, L1 cache to avoid network hops
    * Fire and forget SET (Like an async SET) this means "set a value, but don't wait to





      [Read more...]
    SQL Analysis with MySQL Proxy – Part 2
    +2 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    As I outlined in Part 1 MySQL Proxy can be one tool for performing SQL analysis. The impact with any monitoring is the art of monitoring will affect the results, in this case the performance. I don’t recommend enabling this level of detailed monitoring in production, these techniques are designed for development, testing, and possibly stress testing.

    This leads to the question, how do I monitor SQL in production? The simple answer to this question is, Sampling. Take a representative sample of your production system. The implementation of this depends on many factors including your programming technology stack, and your MySQL topology.

    If for example you are using PHP, then defining MySQL proxy on a production system, and executing firewall rules to

      [Read more...]
    Short Videos from OSCON
    +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down
    Previous 30 Newer Entries Showing entries 61 to 90 of 181 Next 30 Older Entries

    Planet MySQL © 1995, 2014, Oracle Corporation and/or its affiliates   Legal Policies | Your Privacy Rights | Terms of Use

    Content reproduced on this site is the property of the respective copyright holders. It is not reviewed in advance by Oracle and does not necessarily represent the opinion of Oracle or any other party.