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10 Newer Entries Showing entries 61 to 70 of 110 10 Older Entries

Displaying posts with tag: amazon (reset)

Open source and the cloud - the quick and the dead
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Savio Rodrigues has published a post arguing that cloud platforms such as Amazon Web Services and Microsoft’s Azure pose a threat to the monetization of open source by specialist vendors.

Savio makes a good case based on the recent launch of AWS’s Relational Database Service, based on MySQL, and Microsoft’s support for MySQL and Tomcat on Azure:

“When Amazon decided to offer MySQL via Amazon RDS, they did so without purchasing MySQL support from Sun. I’ve confirmed that Microsoft Azure is supporting MySQL on …

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451 CAOS Links 2009.11.06
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Funambol acquires Zapatec. Open source gains Closure. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

For the latest on Oracle’s acquisition of MySQL via Sun, see Everything you always wanted to know about MySQL but were afraid to ask

# Funambol …


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451 CAOS Links 2009.10.30
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Government adoption. Financial results. New funding. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

For the latest on Oracle’s acquisition of MySQL via Sun, see Everything you always wanted to know about MySQL but were afraid to ask

Government …


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Comparing Cloud Databases: SimpleDB, RDS and ScaleDB
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Amazon’s SimpleDB isn’t a relational database, but it does provide elastic scalability and high-availability. Amazon’s recently announced Relational Database Services (RDS) is a relational database, but it doesn’t provide elastic scalability or high-availability. If you are deploying enterprise applications on the cloud (including Amazon Web Services), you might want to look at ScaleDB because it is a relational database and it does provide elastic scalability and high-availability.

Amazon describes SimpleDB by comparing it to a clustered database:

"A traditional, clustered relational database requires a sizable upfront capital outlay, is complex to design, and often requires …

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Comparing Cloud Databases: SimpleDB, RDS and ScaleDB
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Amazon’s SimpleDB isn’t a relational database, but it does provide elastic scalability and high-availability. Amazon’s recently announced Relational Database Services (RDS) is a relational database, but it doesn’t provide elastic scalability or high-availability. If you are deploying enterprise applications on the cloud (including Amazon Web Services), you might want to look at ScaleDB because it is a relational database and it does provide elastic scalability and high-availability.

Amazon describes SimpleDB by comparing it to a clustered database:

"A traditional, clustered relational database requires a sizable upfront …

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451 CAOS Links 2009.10.27
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Red Hat invests in EnterpriseDB. The White House goes open source. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

For the latest on Oracle’s acquisition of MySQL via Sun, see Everything you always wanted to know about MySQL but were afraid to ask

In other …


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Three key things to know about moving MySQL into the cloud.
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The question "what problems will I have when migrating to the cloud" gets asked often enough. If by cloud you mean Amazon EC2, then from a technical perspective there isn't much that changes. The biggest thing that changes is just how you pay your bill.

Having said that, there's still a few potential gotchas:

  1. There are no Virtual IP addresses. Most High Availability tools (like MMM or DRBD+Heartbeat)
    work on the principal of having a floating IP address which is used for the application to connect to the current master. With EC2, you can't do this.

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As license issues swirl, a new CAOS report
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There has been no shortage of lively discussion on open source software licenses with recent shifts in the top licenses, perspectives on the licenses or lack of them for networked, SaaS and cloud-based software, increased prominence of a Microsoft open source license and …

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451 CAOS Links 2009.06.19
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Red Hat betas Enterprise Virtualization, partners with HP for SOA. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Red Hat announced that its Enterprise Virtualization portfolio of products is now available for beta testing.

# Red Hat collaborated with HP on SOA.

# David Megginson published mixing GPL and non-GPL: a different …


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Your opinion on EC2 and other cloud/hosting options
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EC2 is nifty, but it doesn’t appear suitable for all needs, and that’s what this post is about.

For instance, a machine can just “disappear”. You can set things up to automatically start a new instance to replace it, but if you just committed a transaction it’s likely to be lost: MySQL replication is asynchronous, EBS which is slower if you commit your transactions on it, or EBS snapshots which are only periodic (you’d have to add foo on the application end). This adds complexity, and thus the question arises whether EC2 is the best solution for systems where this is a concern.

When pondering this, there are two important factors to …

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10 Newer Entries Showing entries 61 to 70 of 110 10 Older Entries

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