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Previous 30 Newer Entries Showing entries 61 to 90 of 162 Next 30 Older Entries

Displaying posts with tag: MySQL 5.6 (reset)

MySQL multi-master operations made simple with Tungsten Replicator 2.1
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Summer is flying by and it's almost time to get back to school! We will be continuing our Tungsten University series on August 22nd, with a live webcast "MySQL Multi-Master Operations Made Simple With Tungsten Replicator 2.1".  Deployment of MySQL multi-master topologies with Tungsten Replicator has been constantly improving. Yet, earlier there were some heavy operations to sustain, and
Recovering temporal types in MySQL 5.6: TIME, TIMESTAMP and DATETIME
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MySQL 5.6 introduces a new feature – microseconds resolution in some temporal types. As of 5.6.4 TIME, TIMESTAMP and DATETIME can have a fractional part. To create a field with subseconds you can specify precision in brackets: TIME(3), DATETIME(6) etc.

Obviously, the new feature requires the format change. All three types may now have a tail with a fractional part. The tail may be one, two or three bytes long and can store up to six digits after the point.

The non-fractional part has changed too. Thus, DATETIME uses only five bytes comparing to eight in previous versions.

As of

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MySQL Utilities Webinar
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On Thursday, Dr Charles Bell and I will be presenting a webinar on MySQL Utilities; there will be a heavy focus on what you can acheive with them and how you should use them. As well as listening to the presentation, this is a great chance to get your questions answered by the experts (Israel Gomez from the engineering team will also be on-line to help with the questions). As always, the webinar is free but you should register in advance here (http://www.mysql.com/news-and-events/web-seminars/focus-on-mysql-utilities/" target="_blank). If the time isn’t convenient, register anyway and you’ll be sent a link to the replay when

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Practical P_S: Extending PROCESSLIST
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MySQL 5.6 introduced major advances to monitoring made via PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA, but also made a change in how it binds to the network by default.  In MySQL 5.5, the –bind-address configuration option defaulted to “0.0.0.0″, meaning only IPv4.  This changed to “*” in MySQL 5.6, accepting connections on both IPv6 and IPv4 interfaces.  Somehow (I’ve not looked into it yet), my (unsupported) WindowsXP installation now refuses to bind to IPv4,

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Practical P_S: Finding which accounts fail to properly close connections
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I’ve previously written about several problems which can benefit from additional visibility provided by PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA in MySQL 5.6, and it’s time to add to that list.  A very common problem involves connections which are not properly closed – they simply idle until they reach wait_timeout (or interactive_timeout, depending on the client flags set), and the server terminates the connection.  Who knows what the root cause is – perhaps the client terminated without cleaning up connections, or maybe there was just no load, or maybe the network cable was unplugged.  It’s something application developers

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Schema changes – what’s new in MySQL 5.6?
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Among many of the improvements you can enjoy in MySQL 5.6, there is one that addresses a huge operational problem that most DBAs and System Administrators encounter in their life: schema changes.

While it is usually not a problem for small tables or those in early stages of product life cycle, schema changes become a huge pain once your tables get a significant amount of data. Planning for maintenance is becoming more and more difficult, and your worldwide users want the service to be up and running 24/7, while on the other hand, your developers desire to introduce schema changes every week.

Read my full article on MySQL Performance Blog

 

Schema changes – what’s new in MySQL 5.6?
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Among many of the improvements you can enjoy in MySQL 5.6, there is one that addresses a huge operational problem that most DBAs and System Administrators encounter in their life: schema changes.

While it is usually not a problem for small tables or those in early stages of product life cycle, schema changes become a huge pain once your tables get a significant amount of data. Planning for maintenance is becoming more and more difficult, and your worldwide users want the service to be up and running 24/7, while on the other hand, your developers desire to introduce schema changes every week.

PITA

But what is the real problem here? Let me illustrate very

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On Oracle NoSQL Database –Interview with Dave Segleau.
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“We went down the path of building Oracle NoSQL database because of explicit request from some of our largest Oracle Berkeley DB installations that wanted to move away from maintaining home grown sharding implementations and very much wanted an out of box technology that can replicate the robustness of what they had built “out of [...]
On operating system upgrades and a packager’s nightmare
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A fairy tale

Once upon a time I did an operating system upgrade, a minor one that should do no harm, but just get me up to date by fixing any bugs in the version I had been using. It seemed like a good idea.

All seemed to be fine. I use a package provided by an external vendor and not the one produced by the operating system provider as this vendor provides a newer version of the package and I need that. The vendor has to make his package fit in the os environment his package is built for and normally does a pretty good job.

I use automation to build my systems and when I built a new one some issues appeared. Related to the new version of the OS the provider had enhanced one of his packages and the installation pulled in new dependencies. The install of the external package I use then broke as it conflicted with the new dependency

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Some new (and useful!!) MySQL 5.6 variables
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Upgrading from MySQL 5.5 to MySQL 5.6 is a fairly straightforward process. However, the move to version 5.6 does bring with it some new varaibles with which to work.

One of the recent innovations (pioneered by Percona in Percona Server 5.5 if I recall correctly) is the ability to "dump" the innodb buffer pool***. This can be done any time MySQL is running and can be configured to be executed during MySQL shutdown. One reason to do this is to have a server "pre-warmed" when you perform a server restart. Why this is important is that during server operation the innodb buffer pool will fill up. Typically the server will operate much better when this buffer pool is full instead of being empty or paritally full because the return of data from the buffer pool is much faster than returning data from disk. 

There are four important variables with each

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Homebrew (Mac OS X) and MariaDB 10.0 series
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Today I performed a brew update. I noticed that MariaDB now exists as stable (5.5.30) and devel (10.0.2). Brew formulas also exist for MySQL (5.6.10) and Percona Server (5.5.30-30.2) now. 10.0.3 is around the corner but I wanted to run 10.0.2 now. This is how I did it:

brew unlink mariadb
brew install --devel mariadb

It’s that simple!

Related posts:

  • Using MariaDB on CentOS 6
  • Testing Fedora 19
  • Paybox Services and seeing MariaDB in use
  • mysql_upgrade is now version-specific by default
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    You’ve just completed an upgrade from MySQL 5.5 to 5.6.  You followed the upgrade instructions in the manual, and ran mysql_upgrade.  But when you start MySQL 5.6, you still see the following error messages like the following in the server error log:

    2013-03-26 16:45:51 5040 [ERROR] Column count of mysql.events_waits_current is w
    rong. Expected 19, found 16. Created with MySQL 50520, now running 50610. Please
    use mysql_upgrade to fix this error.
    2013-03-26 16:45:51 5040 [ERROR] Column count of mysql.events_waits_history is w
    rong. Expected 19, found 16. Created with MySQL 50520, now running 50610. Please
    use mysql_upgrade to fix this error.

    What went wrong?

    Well, because mysql_upgrade is a client






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    Finding the source of problematic queries
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    Many MySQL users are familiar with using slow query logs and tools such as mysqldumpslow to identify poor-performing SQL commands, and MySQL 5.6 introduces new powerful tools in PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA.  Both allow you to identify the date/time and the user account from which the command was issued, which is helpful – but if you’re using MySQL Enterprise Monitor (MEM), you can immediately identify the actual line of code responsible for the SQL command in question.  This happens to be one of my favorite and powerful features of MEM, but it’s frequently overlooked by new and experienced MEM users alike, so I’m writing the post to highlight it.

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor, of course, is a commercial product that’s part of the MySQL Enterprise subscription.  But it’s freely-available under 30-day trial terms for evaluation from

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    The small improvements of MySQL 5.6: Duplicate Index Detection
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    Here at the MySQL Performance Blog, we’ve been discussing the several new features that MySQL 5.6 brought: GTID-based replication, InnoDB Fulltext, Memcached integration, a more complete

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    Replication in MySQL 5.6: GTIDs benefits and limitations – Part 1
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    Global Transactions Identifiers are one of the new features regarding replication in MySQL 5.6. They open up a lot of opportunities to make the life of DBAs much easier when having to maintain servers under a specific replication topology. However you should keep in mind some limitations of the current implementation. This post is the first one of a series of articles focused on the implications of enabling GTIDs on a production setup.

    The manual describes very nicely how to switch to GTID-based replication, I won’t repeat

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    Easier Overview of Current Performance Schema Setting
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    While I prepared for my Hands-On Lab about the Performance Schema at MySQL Connect last year, one of the things that occurred to me was how difficult it was quickly getting an overview of which consumers, instruments, actors, etc. are actually enabled. For the consumers things are made more complicated as the effective setting also depends on parents in the hierarchy. So my thought was: “How difficult can it be to write a stored procedure that outputs a tree of the hierarchies.” Well, simple enough in principle, but trying to be general ended up making it into a lengthy project and as it was a hobby project, it often ended up being put aside for more urgent tasks.

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    How to tell whether MySQL Server uses yaSSL or OpenSSL
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    Starting with MySQL 5.6, MySQL commercial-license builds use OpenSSL.  yaSSL – previously used as the default SSL library for all builds – remains the implementation for Community (GPL) builds, and users comfortable building from source can choose to build with OpenSSL instead.  Daniel van Eeden recently requested a global variable to indicate which SSL library was used to compile the server (bug#69226), and it’s a good request.  It’s something I’ve previously requested as well, having been fooled by the use of have_openssl as a synonym for

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    MySQL 5.6 general query log behavior change
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    The MySQL general query log can be a useful debugging tool, showing commands received from clients.  In versions through MySQL 5.5, you could count on the GQL to log every command it received – the logging happened before parsing.  That can be helpful – for example, the GQL entries might have records of somebody unsuccessfully attempting to exploit SQL injection vulnerabilities that result in syntax exceptions.

    Here’s a sample, which I’ll run in both 5.5 and 5.6 and show the resulting GQL:

    mysql> SELECT 1;
    +---+
    | 1 |
    +---+
    | 1 |
    +---+
    1 row in set (0.00 sec)
    
    mysql> SELECT NOTHING();
    ERROR 1305 (42000): FUNCTION NOTHING does not exist
    mysql> SELECT 2;
    +---+
    | 2 |
    +---+
    | 2 |
    +---+
    1 row in set (0.00 sec)

    In 5.5, this produces the following in the general query log:

    130513
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    Webinar: MySQL 5.6 Performance Schema
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    This Wednesday, May 15 at 10 a.m. Pacific, I’ll be leading  a Webinar titled, “Using MySQL 5.6 Performance Schema to Troubleshoot Typical Workload Bottlenecks.

    In this Webinar I will offer an overview of Performance Schema, focusing on new features that have been added in MySQL 5.6, go over the configuration and spend most time showing how you can use the wealth of information Performance Schema gathers to understand some of the typical performance bottlenecks.

     

    Other areas of focus

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    Connector/J 5.1.25 Released
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    MySQL Connector/J 5.1.25 has been released, and is available in Community and Enterprise flavors on dev.mysql.com and My Oracle Support, respectively.  I’ve already noted the addition of support for connection attributes for MySQL 5.6 – 5.1.25 adds this functionality.  This release also includes a fix for Bug#68733, which caused the special light-weight ping operation to execute only against the master and currently-selected slave, rather than the master plus all active

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    The other MySQL 5.6 Replication features!
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    2010 was a good year for implementing many small feature requests. Lets start by thanking those responsible for requesting these enhancements: Matt Lord, Mikiya Okuno, Matthew Montgomery, Mark Callaghan, Domas Mituzas and Mats Kindahl.
    MySQL 5.6 has lots of big and shinny new replication features. In fact some, like global transaction identifiers or multi-threaded slave, are multiple features together under one big headline. Therefore, they get a lot of buzz and since they are complex, game-changing and very exciting to the end user, they deserve a lot of blog posts. But what about other smaller enhancements that are in 5.6 but that do not get so much highlight? 
    Let me present a few that I think are particularly interesting, especially for monitoring and/or configuration purposes. To get more details, click on the links and they will take you to the

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    Fresh dogfood: Migrating to InnoDB fulltext search on bugs.mysql.com
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    Even frequent visitors to bugs.mysql.com can sometimes miss the little note in the bottom right corner of each page:

    Page generated in 0.017 sec. using MySQL 5.6.11-enterprise-commercial-advanced-log

    That text changed this past weekend, going from MySQL Enterprise 5.6.10 to 5.6.11.  But more importantly, the collection of MyISAM tables which support the bugs system were also converted to InnoDB.  There’s a little story to tell here about eating this particular helping of dogfood which also amplifies changelog comments, so here it is:

    We like to keep bugs.mysql.com on a current release of MySQL, and

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    Spring cleaning: Useless clients and programs
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    Stewart Smith recently questioned the current relevance of the MERGE storage engine, and it prompted me to finish a similar recent exercise I’ve been thinking about related to MySQL clients (UPDATE: and programs).  This originally came up when I listed the contents of the MySQL bin directory:

    D:\mysql-advanced-5.6.11-win32>dir bin\*.exe
    Volume in drive D is Data
    Volume Serial Number is 4015-B2FF

    Directory of D:\mysql-advanced-5.6.11-win32\bin

    04/05/2013  06:52 AM           123,392 echo.exe
    04/05/2013  06:53 AM         4,696,064 innochecksum.exe
    04/05/2013  06:54 AM         5,084,672 myisamchk.exe
    04/05/2013  06:54 AM         4,084,736 myisamlog.exe




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    Not-so-light reading: 5.6.11 changelog
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    Looking for some substantial reading material as the days grow longer?  You might consider dedicating a good chunk of time to review the MySQL 5.6.11 changelog.  The MySQL Engineering team at Oracle has been busy, and it shows in this maintenance release.  Stewart Smith recently noted the growth of the code base in 5.6 compared to 5.5.  That may or may not be the best measure of productivity, but the number of fixed bugs in a maintenance release like 5.6.11 is sure a good indicator.  A few general observations based on my quick study:

    • 201 individual notes in the changelog
    • 198 referenced bug reports (total, not de-duplicated)
    • 61 bugs from community bugs system
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    MySQL: Every detail matters
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    Some bugs can have a high impact if it causes data corruption, security issues or simply causes MySQL to crash. But what about small bugs and small usability issues?

    This entry from the MySQL 5.6.8 release notes is an interesting one:
    InnoDB: On startup, MySQL would not start if there was a mismatch between the value of the innodb_log_file_size configuration option and the actual size of the ib_logfile* files that make up the redo log. This behavior required manually removing the redo log files after changing the value of


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    Moving to MySQL 5.6? We can help
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    If you are looking for a class that is designed to jump-start your knowledge on MySQL 5.6 features, a class that provides hands-on labs, and a class that shows various migration methods – look no further.

    We have been hard at work building a new class to ensure you have the knowledge and skills needed to verify your applications, and plan for the migration to MySQL 5.6. The class is called Moving to MySQL 5.6 and is a 2-day workshop.

    The Moving to MySQL 5.6 workshop is being offered

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    MySQL 5.6 – InnoDB Memcached Plugin as a caching layer
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    A common practice to offload traffic from MySQL 5.6 is to use a caching layer to store expensive result sets or objects.  Some typical use cases include:

    • Complicated query result set (search results, recent users, recent posts, etc)
    • Full page output (relatively static pages)
    • Full objects (user or cart object built from several queries)
    • Infrequently changing data (configurations, etc)

    In pseudo-code, here is the basic approach:

    data = fetchCache(key)
    if (data) {
      return data
    }
    data = callExpensiveFunction(params)
    storeCache(data, key)
    return data

    Memcached is a very popular (and proven) option used in production as a caching layer.  While very fast, one major potential shortcoming of memcached is that it is not persistent.  While a common design

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    Why MySQL Performance at Low Concurrency is Important
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    A few weeks ago I wrote about “MySQL Performance at High Concurrency” and why it is important, which was followed up by Vadim’s post on ThreadPool in Percona Server providing some great illustration on the topic. This time I want to target an opposite question: why MySQL performance at low concurrency is important for you.

    I decided to write about this topic as a number of recent blog

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    Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo 2013: It feels like 2007 again
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    I actually don’t remember exactly whether it was in 2006, 2007 or 2008 — but around that time the MySQL community had one of the greatest MySQL conferences put on by O’Reilly and MySQL. It was a good, stable, predictable time.

    Shortly thereafter, the MySQL world saw acquisitions, forks, times of uncertainly, more acquisitions, more forks, rumors (“Oracle is going to kill MySQL and the whole Internet”) and just a lot of drama and politics.

    And now, after all this time some 6 or 7 years later, it feels like a MySQL Renaissance. All of the major MySQL players are coming to the

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    Percona MySQL University coming to Toronto this Friday!
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    Percona CEO Peter Zaitsev leads a track at Percona MySQL University in Raleigh, N.C. on Jan. 29, 2013.

    Percona MySQL University, Toronto is taking place this Friday and I’m very excited about this event because it is a special opportunity to fit a phenomenal number of specific and focused MySQL technical talks all into one day, for free.

    Over the course of the day we will cover some of the hottest topics in the MySQL space. There will be talks covering topics like MySQL 5.6, MySQL in the Cloud and High Availability for MySQL, as well as

      [Read more...]
    Previous 30 Newer Entries Showing entries 61 to 90 of 162 Next 30 Older Entries

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