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Previous 30 Newer Entries Showing entries 31 to 60 of 221 Next 30 Older Entries

Displaying posts with tag: Non-Tech Articles (reset)

Log Buffer #166: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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This week the Log Buffer is a little more challenging for two reasons: a) Oracle Open World 2009 and b) the controversy around Monty Widenius‘ opposition to Oracle owning MySQL due to the Sun acquisition, so let’s go straight to the articles.

Oracle – Oracle Open World 2009

There is so much material about OOW09, that I’m giving a full subtitle to it.

Let’s start with a quick recap of the keynotes by Scott McNealy and Larry Elison in this article by Andrew Clarke: The return of The Scott And Larry Show. The

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Logs Go Un-Buffered Worldwide
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I regret to say, there is no Log Buffer this week, as we’ve all been busy preparing for the Big New Thing coming in a few days. The good news is, we have a Big New Thing coming in a few days. Stay tuned for that, you won’t want to miss it.

LB will be back in a week, with Gerry Narvaja at the helm. In the meantime, I invite you to leave a comment with your favourite DB blogs from this week — MySQL, Oracle, Microsoft SQL Server, DB2, Postgres, Ingres, or other relational/NoSQL databases.

Log Buffer #165: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 165th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

Since they haven’t had any Log Buffer love for a couple weeks, let’s start this one with . . . 

PostgreSQL

Selena Marie Deckelmann was tending the garden and found a Snow Leopard amongst the Macintoshes. The result, her post Snow Leopard and PostgreSQL: installation help links.

Josh Berkus posts a poll on encrypted backup. he

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Log Buffer #164: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 164th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

SQL Server

We have a delicious assortment of technical posts from the SQL Server world this week.

Piotr Rodak writes, “While I always knew and imagined that ON DELETE CASCADE may be useful, I wondered, what scenarios would be suitable for ON UPDATE CASCADE. I still don’t have this answer, but I came across some interesting behavior which kept me occupied for quite a bit more time that I had intended to.”

On In Recovery…, Paul S.

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Upcoming Boston MySQL User Group: SHOW ENGINE INNODB STATUS demystified
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On Monday, October 12, 2009* from 7-9 pm at MIT, I will be giving a presentation explaining SHOW ENGINE INNODB STATUS for the Boston MySQL User Group. There is information about foreign keys, transactions, deadlocks and mutexes just waiting to be discovered, and I will show how to decipher the information.

For all those in the Boston area, I hope to see you there! For those who cannot be there, we will video this presentation and make it available online, and post here when the video/slides are up.

*Yes, I realize that this is a bank holiday in the US.

Log Buffer #163: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome, readers, to the 163rd edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs, your sieve

Oracle

First, the ghastly news—Tom Kyte said “I’m not a DBA anymore.” Say it ain’t so, Tom! “After nine years and nine months of running the database that hosts asktom, I’ve retired . . . not from answering questions, but rather from being the DBA and semi-SA for the machine that was asktom.oracle.com.” Okay, so he said it ain’t so.

Meanwhile, Tom’s Oak Table colleague, Jonathan Lewis, played no head games on us, but he has been at the

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Log Buffer #162: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 162nd edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

Oracle

The big news this week came was Oracle’s unveiling the OLTP Oracle Database Machine & Exadata v2, as reported by Alex Gorbachev.

Kevin Closson covered it, of course: Oracle Drops Exadata In Favor of Sun FlashFire Based OLTP Database Machine?, and he and his readers kick it around in a diverting way.

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Nick Westerlund: Narak iktar tard!
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On the 23rd of June 2008, I wrote a note saying that I had just joined Pythian. Today I am posting a similar, but different, note saying that as of the last of September, I will no longer be employed by Pythian, the time has come to look for new challenges. Although I am sad to leave, I do look forward to the future and what it may hold for me.

I wanted to take this moment to thank Pythian for having me, for having such great co-workers whom I count myself lucky to have worked with. I also want to give a special thanks to Augusto for taking care of me when I first joined, and showing me around how the company works. I must thank Paul as well—he is an exceptional person to work with, and I’ve come

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Log Buffer #161: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 161st edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs … and the first one under my penmanship.

MySQL

Johan Andersson explains in a very simple way the scenarios in which you may fall into a split brain situation and how to avoid it in MySQL Cluster on two hosts – options and implications. An article worth reading from one of the MySQL Cluster experts.

I love simple scripts that solve complex problems. I love it even more when the command line can be defined in an alias, and SQL from SQL

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Log Buffer #160: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 160th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

MySQL

Blame it on MyISAM, says Mark Callaghan of High Availability MySQL, on considering sql_mode and type coercion. “I think that MyISAM has its place,” writes Mark. “It does fast table scans, but InnoDB is much faster on just about everything else. I am just not thrilled with the impact it has had on MySQL.”

Not that those other engines are without flaw. Peter Zaitsev reports on an InnoDB performance gotcha with larger

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Log Buffer #159: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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This is the 159th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs. Welcome.

MySQL

Sun’s Trent Lloyd cautions Watch out for hostname changes when using replication!, for there is a gotcha there.

Justin Swanhart was also in the cautioning business this week, saying Be careful with BETWEEN clauses, because the MySQL optimizer is not smarter than a fifth grader!. The readers say, that’s SQL.

Anyway, it’s probably unwise to underestimate the intelligence of a

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OpenSQLCamp 2009 presentation videos are online and free!
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In record time, less than a week after the conference (thanks to the free Pinnacle Video Spin and YouTube), all 11 videos that were taken at OpenSQLCamp Europe are online.

For those who missed the sessions, or just want to relive the fun!

Almost all the sessions were filmed; regrettably Darren Cassar’s Securich – MySQL user administration and security made easy! and Stephane Combaudon’s Minimizing data access with covering indexes were not.

The YouTube videos have the descriptions and resources from the official conference pages, and links to pages. If there is more information to add (for example, the slides from

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Log Buffer #158: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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This is the 158th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

SQL Server

Simon Sabin has a TSQL Challenge – counting non zero columns. He says, “I’m working on a project where I need to cycle a flag amongst a set of columns. To achieve this I am storing a position value in each column which allows me to cycle them . . .  So the challenge is to find out the how many non zero columns there are, the twist is to use as little code as possible.”

On a cue from Simon, Aaron

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Log Buffer #157: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 157th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly, cross-platform review of database blogs.

SQL Server

We start with Michelle Ufford, the SQL Fool, who gives us the poor (wo)man’s graph, a fast and ingenious way to create handsome text-based graphs.

What is the importance of running regular consistency checks? Paul S. Randal returns with some survey results and analysis. He writes, “The results are actually surprising – I didn’t expect so many people to be running

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Log Buffer #156: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 156th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

Oracle

Jonathan Lewis gets things rolling with his post, Empiricism. Jonathan asks his readers if an empirical approach to tuning would be appropriate for a particular wait scenario.

Doug Burns was also looking into wait times, beginning, “Sometimes you think a subject is understood so well, including by yourself, that you tend to overlook it until asked to explain it. That which seems intuitive to us

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2009 MySQL Conference/Camp Videos
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It’s been just over three months since the April 2009 MySQL Users Conference and Expo. It took a while for the files to be processed, and then uploaded to www.technocation.org, and then I found out that the online streaming was not working properly. So I started playing with things, re-encoding some videos, updating the software, but to no avail.

Just as I was about to give up I got notification that Technocation, Inc. was accepted into YouTube’s not-for-profit program, which allows movies larger than 10 minutes to be uploaded and viewed advertisement-free.

So then I had to upload the videos to YouTube and add descriptions.

So with no *further* delay, here are all the videos from the 2009 MySQL Conference and 2009 MySQL Camp:

The brief description — just the

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Log Buffer #155: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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This is the 155th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

SQL Server

On the SQL Server blogs this week, CSS SQL Server Engineers demonstrated that using DateDiff can query performance problems in SQL 2005 and 2008.

The kind of problems, perhaps, that Linchi Shea examines in his post on linked server security configuration and how it can hurt you. Linchi writes,

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Dependence on MySQL Documentation
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I think many people truly realized how much they take the MySQL documentation for granted during the recent multi-hour outage from mysql.com’s data center. Apparently there is a lot of FUD floating around about the legality of mirroring the documentation, as presented by Justin Swanhart and asked by Mark Callaghan.

The manual page at http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/copyright-mysql.html says:

You shall not publish or distribute this documentation in any form or on any media, except if you distribute the documentation in a manner similar to how Sun disseminates it (that is, electronically for download on a Web site with the software) or on a

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Sheeri Visiting Europe in Late August
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OpenSQLCamp 2009 is happening “in parallel to the Free and Open Source Conference 2009 (FrOSCon) on Saturday 22nd and Sunday 23rd August in St. Augustin, Germany …. close to Bonn and Cologne.”

I plan on being at FrOSCon and OpenSQLCamp. Where I go before and after that is up to *you*. Yes, that is right, perhaps I will visit a user group, such as France’s MySQL User Group. Or perhaps your company needs the type of services Pythian can offer — we can do the “traditional consulting” model where we look over your systems for performance tuning and security gains, or fix problems in an emergency. Even more of a win, we specialize in recurring engineering — we can supplement your existing IT staff with

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Log Buffer #154: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 154th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs. Let’s dive right in, shall we?

Oracle

On Radio Free Tooting, Andrew Clarke says, “No SQL, so what?” taking as his keynote something Nuno Souto said: “ . . . Google, Facebook, Myspace, Ning etcetc, and what they do as far as IT goes, are absolutely and totally irrelevant to the VAST majority of enterprise business.”

Aman Sharma gives an overview of Library Cache on Arista’s Oracle Blog.

On The Dutch

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Database Analyst Steals Credit Card Data
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This blog post was inspired by a recent report of a Database Analyst at American Express stealing Credit Card data.

It’s amazing how many companies still follow a mainly “perimeter security” approach when it comes to controlling access to sensitive information—their focus is on network security using firewalls, advanced authentication options, and so on. Even with such measures, it’s very common to setup strong barriers to the outside world but very little by way of internal limits; most internal people have some level of access to servers that store and process sensitive data.

Well, there’s nothing wrong with pre-screening your stuff, or having

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Log Buffer #153: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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This is the 153rd edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

Let’s start by revisiting a perennial issue with Craig Mullins addresses with the question, Are DBAs Obsolete? “Before we go any further, let me briefly answer the question posed in the title of this blog entry: ‘No Way!’,” writes Craig. “Every time I hear this it makes me shake my head sadly as I regard just how gullible IT publications can be.” He argues that an Internet-paced attitude regarding the work of the DBA may be the first culprit in the devaluation of the DBA’s work.

Oracle

Dion Cho, the

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Want to spend a weekend in Germany talking about Databases?
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If so, you should check out OpenSQLCamp 2009, European Edition. November last year, the home of OpenSQL Camp was Charlottesville, VA, but now it is time to have something a bit more local. OpenSQL Camp will take place Saturday 22nd and Sunday 23rd of August, in St. Augustin, Germany, so it could do for a nice August getaway to Germany.

It’s not really the biggest of cities, but then again, that is part of the charm, going to some small city and learning more about databases.
In case you do happen to be curious, feel free to check out the list of proposed sessions, although it is not complete, it does give a overview of what to expect.

I for one am looking forward to a European event, as it seems like most


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Log Buffer #152: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 152nd edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

PostgreSQL

Courtesy the United States PostgreSQL Association, the big news: PostgreSQL 8.4 Released!.

Josh Berkus writes, “Now that PostgreSQL 8.4 is out, I thought I’d write a little about my favorite 8.4 feature. As Mr. Performance Whack-a-Mole, what makes me happy about 8.4 is the ability to whack moles faster … which is why I’m very fond of pg_stat_statements.”

On ad’s corner,

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Concerns and What Does Not Work in XtraDB Backup
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A short time ago I posted how I was Using XtraDB Backup to backup InnoDB. Overall, the blog post was positive, but experiences that others have had (and commented to on that blog post) have made me want to put out another short article about using XtraDB backup.

The first few points remain the same — the backup process is stable, we were able to use the binaries without compiling, and using Innobackupex as the wrapper script, analogous to Innobackup.pl.

However, we did figure out why Xtrabackup had to be run as the mysql user:

Xtrabackup writes to the data dictionary file (ibdata1, for example). We have not examined if it also writes to the data and index files (still ibdata1 by default, or the .ibd files when using innodb_file_per_table). [EDIT: The

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Pythian Goes to FISL 10
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Hi All!

This year, the International Free Software Forum celebrated its 10th anniversary. It happened last week in Porto Alegre.

Pythian presented a session on Thursday called 8 Rules for Designing More Secure Applications with MySQL.

As promised, here are the slides we used on that session: 8 Simple Rules to Design Secure Apps with MySQL (PDF).

Cheers!

Log Buffer #151: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 151st edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs. We’re going to take a fast tour through the best blogs from the week gone by, beginning this time, with Oracle.

Jonathan Lewis writes, “It occurred to me recently that I might be making casual use of terms that weren’t necessarily very well known to the less experienced user. So I’ve decided to build a glossary of terms – and I’ll try to add to it from time to time whenever I have a few minutes.”

Jonathan might want to add “Method R” to the glossary. Cary

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Eric Day Speaks About Gearman and Drizzle July 6, 2009 in Boston
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The July meeting of the Boston MySQL User Group will feature Eric Day, a prominent Drizzle developer, talking about Drizzle and Gearman:

In this talk we will discuss two growing technologies: Drizzle and Gearman.

We will explain what the Drizzle project is, what we aim to accomplish, and an overview of where we are at. We will also be introducing the fundamentals of how to leverage Gearman, an open-source, distributed job queuing system. Gearman’s generic design allows it to be used as a building block for almost any use - from speeding up your website to building your own Map/Reduce cluster. We will tie Drizzle and Gearman together and demonstrate how they work in a custom Search Engine application.

————————

Here is the URL for MIT’s Map with the location of this

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Images in a database
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About six months ago, the question of storing images in a database came up. This is one of my favorite topics, and has many database-agnostic parts.

Personally, I think “tell me about storing images in a database” is actually a great interview question, because you will be able to see the difference between someone who has just memorized “what’s right” versus someone who is really thinking. It also helps you see how someone will communicate — if they just say “NEVER do it, it’s as bad as crossing the streams!” then they are a type of person that gives you a short answer, without much explanation, and without many nuances. (That may be what you are looking for, but usually you want someone who gives reasons for why they strongly feel one way or

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Log Buffer #149: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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This is the 149th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

MySQL

Let’s begin with the big-picture stuff. Jeremy Zawodny laid out his view of the state of MySQL in Linux Magazine’s blog, noting the rough transition between versions 5.0 and 5.1, the status of storage engines, and outside contributions.

Like Baron Schwartz’s Maatkit, for example. Baron announced this week that he is writing a book about Maatkit, and also

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