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10 Newer Entries Showing entries 31 to 40 of 759 10 Older Entries

Displaying posts with tag: innodb (reset)

MySQL 5.7 and GIS, an Example
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Summary
This post will offer a very simple demonstration of how you can use MySQL 5.7 for Spatial features within your applications. In order to demonstrate this, I’ll walk through how we can determine the 10 closest Thai restaurants to a particular location. For this example, we’ll be using the apartment that I lived in when I first started working at MySQL, back in 2003.

For more details on all of the new GIS related work that we’ve done in MySQL 5.7, please read through these blog posts from the developers:


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WordPress and UTF-8
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For many years, MySQL had only supported a small part of UTF-8, a section commonly referred to as plane 0, the “Basic Multilingual Plane”, or the BMP. The UTF-8 spec is divided into “planes“, and plane 0 contains the most commonly used characters. For a long time, this was reasonably sufficient for MySQL’s purposes, and WordPress made do with this limitation.

It has always been possible to store all UTF-8 characters in the latin1 character set, though latin1 has shortcomings. While it recognises the connection between upper and lower case characters in Latin alphabets (such as English, French and German), it doesn’t recognise the same connection for other alphabets. For example, it doesn’t know that ‘Ω’ and ‘ω’ are the upper and lower-case

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InnoDB Transparent PageIO Compression
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We have released some code in a labs release that does compression at the InnoDB IO layer. Let me answer the most frequently asked question. It will work on any OS/File system that supports sparse files and has “punch hole” support. It is not specific to FusionIO. However, I’ve been told by the FusionIO developers that you will get two benefits from FusionIO + NVMFS, no fragmenation issues and more space savings because of a smaller file system block size. Why the block size matters I will attempt to explain next.

The high level idea is rather simple. Given a 16K page we compress it using your favorite compression algorithm and write out the only the compressed data. After writing out the data we “punch a hole” to release the unused part of the original 16K block back to the file system. Let me illustrate with an example:

[DDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD]

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Significant performance boost with new MariaDB page compression on FusionIO
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The MariaDB project is pleased to announce a special preview release of MariaDB 10.0.9 with significant performance gains on FusionIO devices. This is is a beta-quality preview release.

Download MariaDB 10.0.9-FusionIO preview

Background

The latest work between MariaDB and FusionIO has focused on dramatically improving performance of MariaDB on the high-end SSD drives produced by Fusion-IO and at the same time delivering much better endurance for the drives themselves. Furthermore, FusionIO flash memory solutions increase transactional database performance. MariaDB includes specialized improvements for FusionIO devices, leveraging a feature of the NVMFS filesystem on these popular, high performance solid state disks. Using this feature, MariaDB 10 can

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Fun with Bugs #32 - some bugs I've reported in March
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Comparing to the previous month I was not really productive bug reporter in March 2014 (partially because I spent few days at a nice FLOSS UK conference where I tried to give a session on PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA). Just 12 reports, of them 5 documentation requests are already closed. There are some interesting reports among other 7 to write about though.

But let me start with good (or not entirely good) news about my older report, Bug #71858 (easy way to crash MySQL with single SELECT

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InnoDB Spatial Indexes in 5.7.4 LAB release
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With MySQL 5.7.4 LAB release, InnoDB now supports “Spatial Index” on geometry data.

Before this new feature, InnoDB stores geometry data as BLOB data, and only prefix index can be created on the spatial data. It is very inefficient when comes to spatial search, especially when it comes to complex geometry data. In most cases, table scan are the only way to get the result. This all changed with InnoDB spatial index, which is implemented as R-tree, any spatial search becomes far more efficient.

InnoDB spatial index can be used with all existing syntax that has been developed for MyISAM spatial index. In addition, InnoDB spatial index supports full transaction properties, as well as isolation levels. It employs predicate lock to prevent phantom scenario.

In InnoDB spatial index, only the object’s Minimum Bounding Box is included in the index,

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on io scheduling again
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Most of database engines have to deal with underlying layers – operating systems, device drivers, firmware and physical devices, albeit different camps choose different methods.
In MySQL world people believe that InnoDB should be handling all the memory management and physical storage operations – maximized buffer pool space, adaptive/fuzzy flushing, crash recovery getting faster, etc. That can result in lots of efficiency wins, as managing everything with data problem in mind allows to tune for efficiency and performance.

Other storage systems (though I hear it from engineers on different types of problems too) like PostgreSQL or MongoDB consider OS to be much smarter and let it do caching or buffering. Which means that in top Postgres expert presentations you will hear much more about operating systems than in MySQL talks. This results in OS knowledge attrition in MySQL world (all you


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InnoDB Crash Recovery Improvements in MySQL 5.7
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Background

InnoDB is a transactional storage engine. Two parts of the acronym ACID (atomicity and durability) are guaranteed by write-ahead logging (WAL) implemented by the InnoDB redo log.

A statement within a user transaction can consist of multiple operations, such as inserting a record into an index B-tree. Each low-level operation is encapsulated in a mini-transaction that groups page-level locking and redo logging. For example, if an insert would cause a page to be split, a mini-transaction will lock and modify multiple B-tree pages, splitting the needed pages, and finally inserting the record.

On mini-transaction commit, the local mini-transaction log will be appended to the global redo log buffer, the page locks will be released and the modified pages will be inserted into the

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Fun with Bugs #31 - what's new in MySQL 5.6.17
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MySQL 5.6.17 will probably be announced loudly at or immediately before Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo next week. But official release announcement via email was made on March 28, release notes and binaries to download are already available, so why not to check them carefully to find out what to expect from this 8th minor release of MySQL 5.6 GA...

First of all, it seems Oracle still does not hesitate to introduce new features and behavior in the process. Just check these major changes:
  • Starting with 5.6.17, MySQL now supports rebuilding regular and partitioned InnoDB tables using



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Innodb redo log archiving
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Percona Server 5.6.11-60.3 introduces a new “log archiving” feature. Percona XtraBackup 2.1.5 supports “apply archived logs.” What does it mean and how it can be used?

Percona products propose three kinds of incremental backups. The first is full scan of data files and comparison the data with backup data to find some delta. This approach provides a history of changes and saves disk space by storing only data deltas. But the disadvantage is a full-data file scan that adds load to the disk subsystem. The second kind of incremental

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10 Newer Entries Showing entries 31 to 40 of 759 10 Older Entries

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