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Displaying posts with tag: General (reset)

OurSQL Episode 151: Tooling Around, Part 1
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This week we start talking about the Python MySQL Utilities. Ear Candy is a pitfall when importing a mysqldump export and At the Movies is "Deploying MySQL in AWS and OpenStack" by Mark Riddoch of SkySQL.

Part 2 of MySQL Utilities
Part 3 of MySQL Utilities
Part 4 of MySQL Utilities
Part 5 of MySQL Utilities

MySQL Utilities
MySQL Utilities documentation

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OurSQL Episode 149: Trolling
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This week we continue our interview with Noam Kritzer of Bakos & Kritzer, talking about patent case law and patent trolls. Ear Candy is temporary table ghost files, and At the Movies is Manipulating JSON with MariaDB and MySQL.

defensive vs. offensive patents

Patent trolls

Trademarks and domain names

Copyright.gov, a resource written for lay people.

read more

OurSQL Episode 148: Intellectual Property
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This week we interview Noam Kritzer from the law firm of Bakos & Kritzer about copyright, patents and trademarks. Ear Candy is about SUBSTRING_INDEX and At the Movies is Colin Charles presenting a panel on MariaDB.

Events
DB Hangops - every other Wednesay at noon Pacific time

Oracle is having a MySQL OTN Virtual Developer Day August 31st.

FrOSCon - Aug 24-25th, 2013 in St. Augustin, Germany.

read more

MariaDB 5.5.32 Now Available
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The MariaDB project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of MariaDB 5.5.32. This is a Stable (GA) release. See the Release Notes and Changelog for detailed information on this release and the What is MariaDB 5.5? page in the AskMonty Knowledgebase for general information about the MariaDB 5.5 series.

Download MariaDB 5.5.32

Release Notes Changelog

  [Read more...]
From MySQL Fulltext Search to Sphinx
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MySQL fulltext search (FTS) is old and well known. It has a simple setup and requires only small changes for querying. For many people it’s more than enough to provide fulltext search. So, here’s the question: why add a new variable – Sphinx – into the system when the database already has the basic functionality? [...]
MariaDB patches for Random Query Generator
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My fellow testers and others who run RQG tests on MySQL flavors might be interested in some additions that are being used for MariaDB testing. While none of them is a major breakthrough, maybe they will make somebody’s life a little easier.

RQG Introduction

A quick introduction for those who have never heard of RQG, but are still curious what this blog post is about.

RQG stands for Random Query Generator, also known as randgen — an open-source product, available under the GPL v2 license. Quoting its home page on Launchpad, it is a “pseudo-random data and query generator that can be used to test any Perl DBI, JDBC or ODBC-compatible SQL server, in particular MySQL, but also JavaDB and PostgreSQL”.

The framework was created by my former

  [Read more...]
MySQL man pages silently relicensed away from GPL
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It has recently been brought to our attention that the MySQL man pages have been relicensed. The change was made rather silently going from MySQL 5.5.30 to MySQL 5.5.31. This affects all pages in the man/ directory of the source code.

You can tell the changes have come during this short timeframe (5.5.30->5.5.31). The old manual pages were released under the following license:

This documentation is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it only under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation; version 2 of the License.

The new man pages (following 5.5.31 and greater – still valid for 5.5.32) are released under the following license:

This software and related documentation are provided under a license agreement containing restrictions on use

  [Read more...]
MariaDB 10.0.3 alpha Now Available
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The MariaDB project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of MariaDB 10.0.3. This is an alpha release. See the release notes and changelog for details.

Download MariaDB 10.0.3

Release Notes Changelog What is MariaDB 10.0?

APT and YUM Repository Configuration Generator

About this  [Read more...]

MariaDB 5.5.31 Now Available
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The MariaDB project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of the MariaDB 5.5.31. This is a Stable (GA) release. See the Release Notes and Changelog for detailed information on this release and the What is MariaDB 5.5? page in the AskMonty Knowledgebase for general information about the MariaDB 5.5 series.

Download MariaDB 5.5.31

Release Notes Changelog

  [Read more...]
The MySQL Cluster storage engine
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This is one close to my heart. I’ve recently written on other storage engines: Where are they now: MySQL Storage EnginesThe MERGE storage engine: not dead, just resting…. or forgotten and The MEMORY storage engine. Today, it’s the turn of MySQL Cluster.

Like InnoDB, MySQL Cluster started outside of MySQL. Those of you paying attention at home may notice a correlation between storage engines not written exclusively for MySQL and being at all successful.

NDB

  [Read more...]
On performance of JDBC drivers.
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Back when the first version of the MariaDB Java Client was released, someone asked in the comments about the performance characteristics of the driver compared to ConnectorJ. I answered with hand-waving, saying that nobody does anything stupid, the performance of the drivers would be roughly the same, but I promised to measure it and tell the world one day. And now that day has come. The day where three MySQL JDBC drivers (ConnectorJ, MariaDB JDBC, and Drizzle JDBC) are compared against each other. Unlike the server, which gets benchmarking attention all the time, there is no standard benchmark for connectors, so I needed to improvise, while trying to keep the overhead of the server minimal. So I did something very primitive to start. I used my two favorite queries:

  • DO 1 — this one does not retrieve a result set, and thus can be seen as a small
  [Read more...]
Percona Live Conference Notes
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This is the required post about things I observed during this years MySQL conference.

Things that are awesome:

  • The tables in sessions. I think these were here last year. They are still awesome this year.
  • The new style power plugs. They solved the problem of people tripping over daisy chained power strips and the strips being accidentally turned off.
  • Massive quantities of coffee and real cream.

Things that can be improved:

  • Lunch tickets. I overheard the same conversation a dozen times about people not being able to find their lunch tickets or not really knowing about them.
  • Make badges reversible. A badge under observation will be facing the wrong way.

Things that just bumped me:

  • The music is different this year. Now it makes me feel like a teenager struggling with a breakup.
  [Read more...]
MariaDB Java Client 1.1.2 Released
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The MariaDB project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of the MariaDB Java Client 1.1.2. This is a Stable (GA) release. See the Release Notes and Changelog for detailed information on this release and the About the MariaDB Java Client page in the AskMonty Knowledgebase for general information about the client.

Download MariaDB Java Client 1.1.2

Release Notes

  [Read more...]
Database Master-Slave Replication in the Cloud
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This is a guest post from Jelastic.

Many developers use master-slave replication to solve a number of different problems, including problems with performance, supporting the backup of different databases, and as a part of a larger solution to alleviate system failures. Traditionally, master-slave replication is done with real servers, but it can also be done with cloud database servers. This guest post from Jelastic (originally published here) describes how to set up MariaDB master-slave replication using their Jelastic PaaS (Platform as a Service).

Replication Overview

Master-slave replication enables data from one database server (the master) to be replicated to one or more other database

  [Read more...]
OurSQL Episode 137: Playing in the Sandbox
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This week we talk to Giuseppe Maxia about MySQL Sandbox. Ear Candy is about table_open_cache, Open_tables and Opened_tables, and At the Movies features MariaDB.

MySQL Sandbox
MySQL Sandbox

Examples:
MariaDB slave of a master:
make sandbox mysql-tarball --master
make sandbox mariadb-tarball --slaveof master-port=foo

Exporting:
./my sqldump instancename

Remote mysql sandbox deploy:
deploy remote sandboxes -m MySQLVer -l list,of,servers

Get MySQL Sandbox on Launchpad

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MariaDB Introduces Atomic Writes
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Sysbench OLTP, transactions per second

When dealing with high performance, low latency storage devices, such as SSD cards, one finds bottlenecks in new places. This is a story about such a bottle neck and how to work around it.

One unique feature of InnoDB is the double write buffer. This buffer was implemented to recover from half-written pages. This can happen in case of a power failure while InnoDB is writing a page (16KB = 32 sectors) to disk. On reading that page, InnoDB would be able to discover the corruption from the mismatch of the page checksum. However in order to recover, an intact copy of the page would be needed.

The double write buffer provides such a copy. Whenever InnoDB flushes a page to disk, it is first written to the double write buffer. Only when the buffer is

  [Read more...]
The MERGE storage engine: not dead, just resting…. or forgotten.
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Following on from my fun post on Where are they now: MySQL Storage Engines, I thought I’d cover the few storage engines that are really just interfaces to a collection of things. In this post, I’m talking about MERGE.

The MERGE engine was basically a multiplexer down to a number of MyISAM tables. They all had to be the same, there was no parallel query execution and it saw fairly limited use. One of the main benefits was that then you could actually put more rows in a MyISAM table than your “files up to 2/4GB” file system allowed. With the advent of partitioning, this really should have instantly gone away

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Sphinx @ Percona Live: Update
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The Percona Live: MySQL User Conference is just around the corner! Before we begin our trek to San Jose, we want to provide you with one last announcement about our upcoming activities. First of all, as we’ve previously mentioned, Andrew Aksyonoff (Sphinx’s founder) is going to be delivering a Sphinx tutorial on the 22nd of April [...]
Refactoring Internal temporary tables (another stab at it)
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A few weekends ago, I started to again look at the code in Drizzle for producing internal temporary tables. Basically, we have a few type of tables:

  • Standard
  • Temporary (from CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE)
  • Temporary (from ALTER TABLE)
  • Internal temporary (to help with query execution)

If you’re lucky enough to be creating one of the first three types, you go through an increasingly lovely pile of code that constructs a nice protobuf message about what the table should look like and hands all responsibility over to the storage engine as to how to do that. The basic idea is that Drizzle gets the heck out of the way and lets the storage engine do its thing. This code path looks rather different

  [Read more...]
New BM25 functions and IDF operators in custom rankers
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Until 2.1.1-beta the functions exposed in custom rankers for handling relevancy based on term frequency and Inverse Document Frequency (IDF) did not take field or document lengths into account. In 2.1.1-beta, Sphinx includes functions that take relevance ranking to the next level. New IDF functions mysql> SELECT * FROM myindex WHERE MATCH(‘less_common more_common’) OPTION RANKER= [...]
MariaDB 5.5.30 now available
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The MariaDB project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of MariaDB 5.5.30. This is a bug fix release. See the release notes and changelog for details.

Download MariaDB 5.5.30

Release Notes  Changelog  Overview of 5.5

APT and YUM Repository Configuration Generator

  [Read more...]
Sphinx @ Percona Live: MySQL User Conference
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It’s that time of year again. The annual migration of MySQL users will soon begin! In a little more than one month’s time, much of the MySQL ecosystem will be gathered at the Percona Live: MySQL User Conference and, as usual, you can expect an appearance from the Sphinx Team. Stop by booth 302 to meet [...]
Other MySQL branch code sizes
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Continuing on from my previous posts, MySQL code size over releases and MariaDB code size I’ve decided to also look into some other code branches. I’ve used the same methodology as my previous few posts: sloccount for C and C++ code only.

There are also other branches around in pretty widespread use (if only within a single company). I grabbed the Google, Facebook and Twitter patches and examined them too, along with Percona Server 5.1 and 5.5.

Codebase LoC (C, C++) +/- from MySQL Google v4 patch 5.0.37 970,110 +26,378 (from MySQL 5.0.37) MySQL@Facebook 1,087,715 +15,768  [Read more...]
MariaDB code size
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Continuing on from my previous post, MySQL code size over releases.

I wanted to look at the different branches/patch sets of MySQL out there and work out how far from upstream they deviated. I’m just going to compare against whatever upstream version the most easily accessible version is based on (be it 5.0.x, 5.1.x or whatever).

For MariaDB versions, I removed innodb_plugin and replaced it with xtradb for stats purposes as the MariaDB innodb_plugin is essentially the same as upstream and I don’t want to artificially inflate the diff size.

The first three major versions of MariaDB were all based on MySQL 5.1. I used sloccount and only counted C and C++ code.

So, let’s look at some of the MySQL patch

  [Read more...]
MariaDB Galera Cluster 5.5.29 Stable (GA) released
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After some final testing and polishing, the MariaDB project and Codership are pleased to announce the release of MariaDB Galera Cluster 5.5.29. This is a Stable (GA) release. MariaDB Galera Cluster links:

About MariaDB Galera  [Read more...]

What does MariaDB 10.0.1 include – available now
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First, congratulations Oracle on the GA of MySQL 5.6! Well done!

In this post I walkthrough the features of the first two alpha versions of MariaDB 10.0. The first, 10.0.0-alpha, which was made available in November, and 10.0.1-alpha that saw daylight yesterday. I will go through the features by placing them in the following categories:

  • MariaDB 10.0-only Features (features that aren’t in MySQL 5.6)
  • MariaDB 10.0 Merged Features (features merged from MySQL 5.6)
  • MariaDB 10.0 Reimplemented Features (features reimplemented from features in MySQL 5.6)
  • MariaDB 5.x Features now in MySQL 5.6 (features introduced in earlier MariaDB versions which have now been introduced in MySQL 5.6)
  • MariaDB 5.x Features Backported from MySQL 5.6 (features introduced in earlier MariaDB versions which were
  [Read more...]
Unbreakable MySQL?
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I’m getting more and more concerned about the current Oracle approach to MySQL security. And the fact that I was solely responsible for the security@mysql.com for about ten years, doesn’t make it easier, on the contrary, it only emphasizes changes in the attitude.

Starting from the obvious — somewhat slower response to critical bug fixes, which can be expected, Oracle is a big company, right? Very little information about security vulnerabilities is disclosed, CPUs are carefully stripped from anything that might help to understand the problem, it takes hours to map them to code changes. Heck, even test cases are kept private now. This seriously smells

  [Read more...]
MariaDB 5.5.29, 5.3.12, 5.2.14, 5.1.67 now available
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The MariaDB project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of the following new stable (GA) MariaDB versions:

  [Read more...]
MariaDB Java Client 1.1.0 released
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The MariaDB Java Client 1.1.0 has been released. You can download it here.

This version focused on fixing all known database metadata bugs and ConnnectorJ incompatibilities. Specific fixes include:

  • Consistent, compatible with ConnectorJ handling of JDBC catalogs vs schemas vs databases
  • Implementation of several missing methods in DatabaseMetaData
  • Better handling of statement timeouts
  • OSGi-specific entries have been added to MANIFEST.MF so it can be used in OSGi environments
  • Added support for dumpQueriesOnException=true in the JDBC URL
  • Added support for IPv6 addresses in the connector
  • Added SSL support
  • and more…

See the Release Notes and

  [Read more...]
MariaDB 10.0 and MySQL 5.6
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In May of last year I blogged about MariaDB 10.0 for the first time. We received some feedback, digested it, and I further explained MariaDB 10.0. Now, with the first Alpha of MariaDB 10.0 out and a new year just beginning, now is a good time to explain a little bit more, especially about MariaDB 10.0 and MySQL 5.6 as I and others in the MariaDB project get asked a lot about the differences between them.

First, here are some details as to why we didn’t just take MySQL 5.6 as a base and create something that would have been called MariaDB 5.6. These details haven’t been widely shared before:

  • The file structure of the codebase in MySQL 5.6 has changed. Single code files have been split
  •   [Read more...]
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