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Displaying posts with tag: DB2 (reset)

Log Buffer #135: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 135th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

How about a little DB2 news to whet the palette? On IT, Life, DB2 pureXML, House Construction, Henrik Loeser Friedrichshafen has an item about Organic Food and pureXML. Completely unrelated! In the on-topic second part of this duo, Henrik relates the news: “I am happy to tell you that the so far separately priced pureXML feature will now be included in the core DB2 for Linux, UNIX, and Windows.” And relevant links are included in this blog.

On the DB2PORTAL Blog, Craig

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Log Buffer #134: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 134th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs. There’s no time to lose, so let’s begin—with MySQL.

The big news this week, the epoch-shattering event, is of course, Monty Widenius’s departure from Sun, his time to move on. Perhaps not much of a surprise, given his famously underwhelmed response to 5.1’s GA release.

But Monty, your thunder has been stolen! MySQL boss Marten Mickos is leaving Sun too. So says Matthew Aslett on

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Implementing Sharding in the Database
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Over the past few weeks (years really) there has been some discussion on sharding. Instead of discussing when sharding is required, as there are good discussions on this already, I want to discuss how I would like to have sharding implemented in the database.

I want the database to handle sharding automatically, and where it can't be automatic, I want the database to help as much as it can.  Just like I want my business logic in a language ideally suited to it, and not stored procs (generally, there are always exceptions); I want all my physical persistence to be handled by the place that already does most of it, the database.  Having the database handle some of the physical persistence and the object relational layer handle the sharding logic isn’t ideal to me, and not just because the current object relational layers

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Log Buffer #131: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 131st edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

Fundamentals are always a good place to start, so let’s do that courtesy Craig Mullins of Data Management Today. Craig’s fundamental question is, what does a DBA do? A good one for blank-faced relatives and dinner-party companions.

Perhaps you’re just a little blank-faced too, a least on the subject of DB2 LUW? If so, Susan Visser of Build your Skill on DB2 shows the way forward with a compilation

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If only Guy Fawkes had a G1…
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Happy Halloween! – well by the time you read this it will be more – Remember, remember the 5th of November!. So what’s been happening?

Well I spent the last month getting to grips with DB2 – why I hear you ask?.
You shouldn’t keep all your eggs in one basket, and there were rumors that DB2 might become Open Source at some point (or not). Anyway even if that never happens there is a lot to learn from the original DBMS and with DB2 Express-C available for free there’s nothing to stop your Open Source app taking advantage of that

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Log Buffer #121: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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This week gives me a chance to get back into something I love to do—write. For those who don’t know, my name is Keith Murphy and I am a MySQL DBA at the Pythian Group. In addition, I have the privilege of being the editor of the MySQL Magazine, a quarterly  magazine for those who use MySQL on a daily basis, either as a DBA or a developer. The sixth issue was just released last week and is available for download now. But enough about me! Let’s see what you all had to say this week.

Beginning with the world of MySQL.

Monty Taylor kicks things off, bringing us news of the

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Top 10 Reserved SQL Keywords
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You may know that I created a SQL Reserved Keywords Checker a few years ago. I was just noticing today that a lot of people are searching for the same keywords. Here's a list of the top 10 keywords people searched for using the tool in the past year:.


# Keyword Queries Is Reserved 10 password 139 Only on PostgreSQL 9 key 148 Yes 8 description 155 No 7 value 156 Yes 6 status 161 No
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Log Buffer #120: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Previously on Log Buffer: Log Buffer #119.

And now.

Welcome to Log Buffer #120. My name is Warner, and I’m a SQL Server DBA at The Pythian Group. This is my first time on Log Buffer duties ever, so here’s hoping I can give everyone a fair and unbiased look at this week in the database blogging world (and related).

I admit I had no idea of the community or state of the PostgreSQL RDBMS, and so I definitely learned some new stuff this week. First off, over on “The Scale-out Blog” Robert Hodges invites us all to get our

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Log Buffer #119: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 119th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

We start in the MySQL world with some engine news. On Brian “Krow” Aker’s Idle Thoughts, Brian explains the state of engines in Drizzle, the pared-down MySQL. He begins, “So many engines, and so little to choose from. This is one of our two major decision points in Drizzle right now.” Maria, Falcon, PBXT, and InnoDB are in the dock.

Arjen Lentz asks a simple question: Would you prefer InnoDB to be the default storage engine?, also the

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Log Buffer #116: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 116th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

This was the week of Oracle Open World (OOW), Oracle’s gigantic annual get-together in San Francisco — always the heaviest week in Oracle blogs, so let’s start there.

For day-by-day coverage of OOW on the ground, I recommend Doug’s Oracle Blog: OOW Day 1, OOW Day 1.5, OOW Day 2,

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Sheeri’s Sordid Past
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I confess — I have not always been an exclusive MySQL user. I have fooled around with other DBMSs. I was young, inexperienced, and I needed the money, I swear!

This comes about because I was doing some electronic de-crufting….From a file last modified on 10:50 am on 2005-06-30:

> more addcatalog.sh
#!/bin/sh

 db2 catalog tcpip node $1 remote $2 server 50000
 db2 terminate
 db2 catalog database sample as $2 at node $1
 db2 terminate

# [db2inst1@midgard db2inst1]$ db2sql92 -a db2inst3/password -d coworkername

And from the same time-frame there’s also:

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Log Buffer #112: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 112th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

First, thanks to last issue’s contributors–Joe Izenman, Dan Norris, and Jason Massie–for snatching victory from the jaws of defeat and making LB#111 a worthwhile read. That’s what it’s all about!

Oracle’s up first, starting with our old friend Doug Burns and his Time Matters series, in which he holds up to the light the concept of

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Log Buffer #110: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 110th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

From the MySQL side, Jeremy Zawodny gets things going this week. He writes about his doubts over the long-term performance of InnoDB, specifically the cost of multiversion concurrency control, particularly in a master-slave arrangment or a DW. Jeremy comments, “[The] disk bloat, fragmentation, and ongoing degradation in performance may be an argument for having some slaves that keep the same data in MyISAM tables.” His readers, however, point out some diagnostics and tools to remedy this concern.

Not that MyISAM is without foibles. Case in point,

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Log Buffer #109: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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It’s time again for another edition of the weekly review of database blogs, Log Buffer. Since it was a big week for SQL Server, let’s start there, shall we?

The big news — SQL Server 2008 is released, as reported by SqlServer-qa.net, in seven different versions. Aaron Bertrand introduces a new kid on the block: SQL Server 2008 Web Edition — “. . . designed for

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Log Buffer #108: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 108th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

With almost no ado at all, let’s begin with the bad news–from StatisticsIO and Jason Massie: The Death of the DBA. And who is the perpetrator of this crime? The Cloud! It sounds like something from a John Carpenter movie, doesn’t it?

Let’s see what Jason is thinking. “I’d like to retire a SQL Server DBA with 40 years experience but I don’t think that will happen. The cloud is coming and it is bad news

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Log Buffer #103: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 103rd edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

Starting with Oracle stuff, Chen Shapira (just a simple DBA on a complex production system) is looking for great PL/SQL. Why? To become a better PL/SQL programmer. “But,” she writes, “for PL/SQL , I’m a bit stuck. I can still read my own code for bad examples, but where can I find examples for great code?  . . .  Somehow, there is simply no open-source code written in PL/SQL that I can read to get a good idea of how PL/SQL should be written.” Niall Litchfield recommends the contents of

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Log Buffer #102: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 102nd edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

Since it was DB2’s 25th birthday this week, as Anant Jhingran reports, let’s start with it.

From ZDNet this week came a story that IBM was considering the open-sourcing of DB2 — big news, naturally, whether true or not. Matthew Aslett of 451 CAOS Theory says, Open source DB2? I don’t think so, suggesting that it was merely theorizing on the part of one

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Open source DB2? I don?t think so.
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ZDNet and its sister sites ran an interesting story yesterday indicating that IBM might be preparing to release its DB2 database under an open source license. If true, it would be a fascinating turn of events that would have a significant impact on the database industry. Unfortunately, it’s not.

I was immediately suspicious when reading the initial story. For a start it quotes a UK IBM executive: IBM’s UK director of information management software, Chris Livesey. With all due respect to him, if IBM was even hinting at open sourcing DB2, it would surely be rolling out the big guns.

Additionally, I’ve had briefings in the last couple of weeks with both IBM’s data management and open source executives, neither of whom thought to mention open sourcing DB2. That didn’t rule

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Log Buffer #101: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome the the 101st edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

This edition was originally claimed by Ward Pond for his SQL Server Blog. Unfortunately, Ward is, in his own words, “dealing with the aftermath of a burst appendix,” which is a very good reason not to spend your time at the computer. Ward, heal up soon! We’ll see you on LB before too long.

In lieu of the normal Log Buffer, I throw it open to our readers. Please leave a comment mentioning your favourite database blog items from the week that was, and anything else you care to say about them.

LB will be back to normal next Friday. See you then!

MySQL and Materialized Views
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I was poking around the MySQL Worklog again over the weekend, and found a request for materialized views for MySQL. This feature has existed in Oracle for a while, in DB2 as a materialized query table, and appeared in MS SQL Server 2000 and 2005 as indexed views.

What is a materialized view?

A materialized view is a database object that contains the results of a query. The FROM clause of the query can name tables, views, and other materialized views. (from Oracle).

Essentially a materialized

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Log Buffer #89: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome to the 89th edition of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs.

Welcome, welcome everyone.

In writing this week’s Log Buffer, I’ve had a chance to sit down and read some excellent posts on all sorts of platforms. The depth and breadth of what’s available to house and retrieve data is astonishing.

Many of you who have read my posts will know that I’m a fan of vegetables. They are something most of us don’t eat enough of. Come on DBAs! I think we need to make a collective effort to get healthy. We need you to keep all these systems alive. I say this because I have a new found appreciation for the work we do day in and day out.

Six

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Log Buffer #87: a Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Welcome the the 87th of Log Buffer, the weekly review of database blogs. First up, a couple of items responding to news about H-Store, the new database technology. Nigel Thomas of Preferisco wonders if H-Store is a new architectural era, or just a toy? Too much information, in turn, asks, Is H-Store the future of database [...]
Are Proprietary Databases Doomed?
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Times of change are upon the database market. The major established database companies are being challenged by open source upstarts like MySQL (http://www.mysql.com) and PostgreSQL. For years, Open Source Databases (OSDBs) have been quietly increasing their penetration, but until recently they have lacked the capabilities to seriously threaten proprietary databases like Oracle, IBM's DB2, and Microsoft's SQL Server.

All that has changed. OSDBs now boast the necessary features and robustness to support commercial databases hundreds of Gigabytes in size. And a growing trickle of competitive benchmark results shows them performing more than acceptably well

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Are Proprietary Databases Doomed?
Employee +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down
Times of change are upon the database market. The major established database companies are being challenged by open source upstarts like MySQL (http://www.mysql.com) and PostgreSQL. For years, Open Source Databases (OSDBs) have been quietly increasing their penetration, but until recently they have lacked the capabilities to seriously threaten proprietary databases like Oracle, IBM's DB2, and Microsoft's SQL Server.

All that has changed. OSDBs now boast the necessary features and robustness to support commercial databases hundreds of Gigabytes in size. And a growing trickle of competitive benchmark results shows them performing more than acceptably well

  [Read more...]
Are Proprietary Databases Doomed?
Employee +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down
Times of change are upon the database market. The major established database companies are being challenged by open source upstarts like MySQL (http://www.mysql.com) and PostgreSQL. For years, Open Source Databases (OSDBs) have been quietly increasing their penetration, but until recently they have lacked the capabilities to seriously threaten proprietary databases like Oracle, IBM's DB2, and Microsoft's SQL Server.

All that has changed. OSDBs now boast the necessary features and robustness to support commercial databases hundreds of Gigabytes in size. And a growing trickle of competitive benchmark results shows them performing more than acceptably well

  [Read more...]
Log Buffer #67: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Hello everyone, I think this will be a great log buffer. Dave has been sick these past two days and as a result, we do not have a comprehensive log buffer ready the way we or a volunteer usually do. This was bound to happen to log buffer at some point and today it has happened. So I [...]
Open Source ETL tools.
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The other day I was looking for a open source, feature-rich, high performance ETL tool to use in an enterprise environment. I was disappointed nothing really seemed to match my requirements. Have I overlooked something or is this really a niche where there aren’t any viable projects? After looking in the usual places like sourceforge.net and doing a bunch of Google searches. I could not find any products that fit the bill. Here are (some of) my criteria:

  • Fast. The candidate tool has to be able to move huge amounts of information between the source and target databases quickly.
  • Flexible error handling. Data errors occur all the time, and when errors are encountered, we should be able to stop processing or log the error to a file or push the record into a violations table for subsequent processing. There are probably other popular strategies for handling errors, such as changing the
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Previous 30 Newer Entries Showing entries 31 to 57

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