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Previous 30 Newer Entries Showing entries 31 to 60 of 687 Next 30 Older Entries

Displaying posts with tag: drizzle (reset)

Questions about MariaDB JDBC Driver
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The recent release of the MariaDB client libraries has prompted questions about their purpose as well as provenance.  Colin Charles posted that some of these would be answered in the very near future.  I have a couple of specific questions about the MariaDB JDBC driver, which I hope will be addressed at that time.  
1.) What is really in the MariaDB JDBC driver and how exactly does it differ from the drizzle JDBC driver?  What, if any, relation is there to Connector/J code?  There is a 
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The state of MySQL client libraries
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Those who’ve been around the MySQL world are probably aware of the much-discussed topics of GPL licensing, dual licensing, and in particular, licensing of the client libraries (also called connectors or drivers) and the FOSS exception (http://www.mysql.com/about/legal/licensing/foss-exception/) to that licensing. This is newly relevant with the announcement of a permissively-licensed MySQL-compatible client library for MariaDB.

The difference is that this time there’s been some question about the provenance and history of the source code. Some people asked me about this. Some of them were aware of a relatively obscure detail: there’ve been permissively licensed MySQL client libraries for years, in the form of libdrizzle, a BSD-licensed library for the Drizzle fork of MySQL.

Here are some of the thoughts that seemed to be going through

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A MySQL Christmas present - Libdrizzle 5.1.0
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Brian Aker and I have been working hard in the last few weeks to give you a great Christmas present, Libdrizzle 5.1.0.  The MySQL compatible, BSD licensed C connector (so static compiling with commercial software gets the thumbs up!).

The latest changes include:
  • A server-side prepared statement API
  • Improved binary log API
  • An example binary log remote retrieval utility using the binlog API called "drizzle_binlogs"
  • A new build system, DDM4 which is used by Gearman and Memcached
  • Many bugs fixes
The source and manuals can be found on the Launchpad downloads page.  Please enjoy, feel free to file bugs, questions and hack on code on our Launchpad page.  Happy holidays to all!
Libdrizzle Redux 5.0-alpha1 Released!
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Over the past few months I have been spending my spare time on a new project.  A new version of libdrizzle which is much simpler to use and with many new features.  Today the first version of this MySQL compatible client is released, called Libdrizzle Redux.

Why 5.0?  Because Libdrizzle 1.0 and 2.0 have already been released, in packaging versions 3.0 and 4.0 used as API revisions.  So 5.0 is the fresh start.


Main Features

These are the main features of the library:

  • A BSD licensed MySQL compatible C connector, so you can statically link it with commercial software
  • A simplified API compared to Libdrizzle.  No more confusion over whether the client or library should be allocating/freeing.  There isn't a big difference to the MySQL C API for most things.
  • New






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Slides for Connectors Talk
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I could not find a way to upload my slides for today's talk entitled "MySQL Compatible Open Source Connectors" on the Percona Live website so the PDF can be viewed on Slideshare.  Enjoy!
Impact of MySQL slow query log
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So, what impact does enabling the slow query log have on MySQL?

I decided to run some numbers. I’m using my laptop, as we all know the currently most-deployed database servers have mulitple cores, SSDs and many GB of RAM. For the curious: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-2620M CPU @ 2.70GHz

The benchmark is going to be:
mysqlslap -u root test -S var/tmp/mysqld.1.sock -q 'select 1;' --number-of-queries=1000000 --concurrency=64 --create-schema=test

Which is pretty much “run a whole bunch of nothing, excluding all the overhead of storage engines, optimizer… and focus on logging”.

My first run was going to be with the slow query log on. I’ll start the server with mysql-test-run.pl as it’s just easy:
eatmydata


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State of the MySQL forks - conclusions
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I promised to still post some general comments about the MySQL ecosystem, to conclude my outlook of State of the MySQL forks and Drizzle. I will do this now in the form of answering questions I got in the comments, twitter and some that I make up just myself.

Oracle has not stopped updating bzr trees

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But what about Drizzle?
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I got several comments and questions on my previous blog "The State of the MySQL forks". One question was "Why didn't you mention Drizzle?" So I will say something about Drizzle here before concluding with other remarks.

So why didn't you mention Drizzle?

Mainly because the post was already long and also I had to wrap up and call into a meeting.

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State of the MySQL forks
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It's been some time since I last wrote an overview of the state of the MySQL forks, but the last few weeks have been eventful enough that it is a good time to again see how the competing variants are positioned against each other.

I have written on this topic 1-2 times a year. Here are links to the previous overviews:

Map of MySQL forks and branches (2010)
The state of MySQL forks: co-operating without co-operating (2010)
Observations on Drizzle and PostgreSQL
Percona.tv: State of the MySQL


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Is Synchronous Data Replication over WAN Really a Viable Strategy?
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Synchronous data replication over long distances has the sort of seductive appeal that often characterizes bad ideas.  Why wouldn't you want every local credit card transaction simultaneously stored on the other side of the planet far away from earthquake, storms and human foolishness?  The answer is simple: conventional SQL applications interact poorly with synchronous replication over wide area networks (WANs).

I spent a couple of years down the synchronous replication rabbit hole in an earlier Continuent product.  It was one of those experiences that make you a sadder but wiser person.  This article digs into some of the problems with synchronous replication and shows why another approach, asynchronous multi-master replication, is currently a better way to manage databases connected by

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Finding out What’s Next at BarCampMel 2012 with Drizzle, SQL, JavaScript and a web browser
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Just for the pure insane fun of it, I accepted the challenge of “what can you do with the text format of the schedule?” for BarCampMel. I’m a database guy, so I wanted to load it into a database (which would be Drizzle), and I wanted it to be easy to keep it up to date (this is an unconference after all).

So… the text file itself isn’t in any standard format, so I’d have to parse it. I’m lazy and didn’t want to leave the comfort of the database. Luckily, inside Drizzle, we have a js plugin that lets you execute arbitrary JavaScript. Parsing solved. I needed to get the program and luckily we have the http_functions plugin that uses libcurl to

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Hacking the Jenkins BZR plugin
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For Drizzle and for all of the projects we work on at Percona we use the Bazaar revision control system (largely because it’s what we were using at MySQL and it’s what MySQL still uses). We also use Jenkins.

We have a lot of jobs in our Jenkins. A lot. We build upstream MySQL 5.1, 5.5 and 5.6, Percona Server 5.1, Percona Server 5.5, XtraBackup 1.6, 2.0 and 2.1. For each of these we also have the normal trunk builds as well as parameterised ones that allow a developer to test out a tree before they ask for it to be merged. We also have each of these products across seven operating systems and for each of those both x86 32bit and 64bit. If we weren’t already in the

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There is a story….
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I have a friend who is fond of telling a story from way back in November 2008 at the OpenSQL camp in Charlottesville, Virgina. This was relatively shortly after we had announced to the public that we’d started something called Drizzle (we did that at OSCON) and was even closer to the date I started working on Drizzle full time (which was November 1st). Compared to what it is now, the Drizzle code base was in its infancy. One of the things we hadn’t yet sorted out was the rewrite of the replication code.

So, I had my laptop plugged into a projector, and somebody suggested opening up some random source file… so I did. It was a bit of the replication code that we’d inherited from MySQL.

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Taxonomy of database tools
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Taxonomy of Database Tools

In the MySQL ecosphere there is an ecosystem of tools.  Like real-world ecosystems, the “creatures” in the MySQL tools ecosystem can be classified and organized by a taxonomy.  There are already multiple taxonomies of software bugs (e.g. A Taxonomy of Bugs), but as far as I know this is the first Taxonomy of Database Tools.  A taxonomy of database tools serves useful purposes, as discussed in the previously linked page.  For me, the most useful purpose is the high-level ecosystem view which I


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Designing a HTTP JSON database api
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A few weeks ago I blogged about the HTTP JSON api in Drizzle. (See also a small demo app using it.) In this post I want to elaborate a little on the design decisions taken. (One reason to do this is to provide a foundation for future work, especially in the form of a GSoC project.)

Looking around: MongoDB, CouchDB, Metabase

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Notes from MySQL Conference 2012 - Part 2, the hard part
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This is the second and final part of my notes from the MySQL conference. In this part I'll focus on the technical substance of talks I saw, and didn't see.

More than ever before I was a contributor rather than attendee at this conference. Looking back, this resulted in seeing less talks than I would have wanted to, since I was speaking or preparing to speak myself. Sometimes it was worse than speaking, for instance I spent half a day picking up pewter goblets from an egnravings shop... (congratulations to all the winners again :-) Luckily, I can make up for some of that by going back and browse their slides. This is especially important whenever 2 good talks are scheduled in the same slot, or in the same slot when I was to speak. So I have categorized topics here along various axes, but also along the "things I did see" versus "things I missed"

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Notes from MySQL Conference 2012 - Part 1, the soft part
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I have finally recovered from my trip to Santa Clara enough that I can scribble down some notes from this year's MySQL Conference. Writing a travel report is part of the deal where my employer covers the travel expense, so even if many people have written about the conference, I need to do it too. And judging from the many posts for instance from Pythian's direction, Nokia is perhaps not the only company with such a policy?

Baron's keynote

There has usually always been something that can be called a "soft keynote". Pirate Party founder Rick Falckvinge speaking at a database conference is a memorable example (I still keep in touch with him, having met him at the Hyatt Santa Clara). This year there was one less day, and therefore less keynotes. The soft keynote was therefore taken care of by Baron using some time out of Peter's opening keynote.

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Disproving the CAP Theorem
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Since the famous conjecture by Eric Brewer and proof by Nancy Lynch et al., CAP has given the world countless learned discussions about distributed systems and many a well-funded start-up.  Yet who truly understands what CAP means?  Even a cursory survey of the blogosphere shows profound disagreement about the meaning of terms like CP, AP, and CA in real systems.  Those who disagree on CAP include some of the most illustrious personages of the database community.

We can therefore state with some confidence that CAP is confusing. Yet this observation itself raises deeper questions.  Is CAP merely confusing?  Or is it the case that as with other initially accepted but

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Drizzle Differences from MySQL
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I decided to take a look at Drizzle today and was encouraged by what I saw. Here’s my favorite part:

There is no UNSIGNED (as per the standard). * There are no spatial data types GEOMETRY, POINT, LINESTRING & POLYGON (go use Postgres). * No YEAR field type. * There are no FULLTEXT indexes for the MyISAM storage engine (the only engine FULLTEXT was supported in). Look at either Lucene, Sphinx, or Solr. * No “dual” table. * The “LOCAL” keyword in “LOAD DATA LOCAL INFILE” is not supported

GO USE POSTGRES. Awesome.

List of differences from MySQL.

Simple GUI to edit JSON records in Drizzle
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So yesterday I introduced the newly committed HTTP JSON key-value interface in Drizzle. The next step of course is to create some simple application that would use this to store data, this serves both as an example use case as well as for myself to get the feeling for whether this makes sense as a programming paradigm.

Personally, I have been a fan of the schemaless key-value approach ever since I graduated university and started doing projects with dozens of tables and hundreds of columns in total. Especially in small projects I always found the array structures in languages like PHP and Perl and Python to be very flexible to develop with. As I was developing and realized I need a new variable or new data field somewhere, it was straightforward to just toss a new

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Sessions I want to see at the MySQL User Conference
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Oh boy, I'm starting to feel the stress of having to prepare a little bit of this and a little bit of that for the upcoming MySQL User Conference (Santa Clara, April 10 to 13). But I wanted to also jump on this meme and list a few sessions I definitively want to attend:

I'm speaking, so I suppose I need to attend:

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SkySQL is Coming to a City Near You!
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Now that the snow is melting and spring is in the air, the SkySQL Team is hitting the road and making the rounds of key industry events, trade shows, and meetups around the globe.  Come meet the team, pick-up a few tips and tricks for using the MySQL database, network with your peers, and learn more about SkySQL’s products and services.  Here are some the events we’ll be at this spring:

BIG Data, A New Horizon for Data Analysis
March 20 - 21, 2012
Cité Internationale Univeritaire de Paris, Paris, France

POSSCON 2012
March 28-29, 2012
Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center, Columbia, South Carolina





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IPv6 in Drizzle, soon in MySQL?
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Earlier today I posted a Drizzle white paper we've been working on: Drizzle and IPv6.

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Presentation: Databases and the Cloud (and why it is more difficult for databases)
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A week ago I again had the pleasure to give a guest lecture at Tampere University of Technology. I've visited them the first time when I worked as MySQL pre-sales in Sun.

To be trendy, I of course had to talk about the cloud. It turns out every section has the subtitle "...and why it is more difficult for databases". I also rightfully claim to have invented the NoSQL key-value development model in 2005.

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A year with Drizzle
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Today I'm coming out of the closet. Since I'm a professional database expert I try to be like the mainstream and use the commercial MySQL forks (including MySQL itself). But I think those close to me have already known for some time that I like community based open source projects. I cannot deny it any longer, so let me just say it: I'm a Drizzle contributor and I'm very much engaged!

I've been eyeing the Drizzle project since it started in 2008. Already then there were dozens of MySQL hackers for which this project was a refuge they instantly flocked to. Finally a real open source project based on MySQL code that they could contribute to, and they did. It was like a breath of fresh air in a culture that previously had only accepted one kind of relationships: that between an employer and an employee. Drizzle was more liberal. It accepted also forms of engagement already common in most other

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Drizzle Day and MariaDB day to end your MySQL user conference
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Good news to all of you who are going or were thinking of going to the Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo. Yesterday two great addon events were announced, both happening on Friday April 13th, right after the main conference:

Drizzle Day 2012

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Drizzle Day 2012
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Henrik has already posted it over on the Drizzle Blog, but I thought I’d give a shout out here too.

We’re holding a Drizzle Day right after the Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo in April. So, since you’re all like me and don’t book your travel this far in advance, it’ll be easy to stay for the extra day and come and learn awesome things about Drizzle.

I’m also pretty glad that my employer, Percona is sponsoring the event.

MySQL progress in a year
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Usually people do this around New Year, I will do it in February. Actually, I was inspired to do this after reviewing all the talks for this year's MySQL Conference - what a snapshot into the state of where we are! It made me realize we've made important progress in the past year, worth taking a moment to celebrate it. So here we go...

Diversification

In the past few years there was a lot of fear and doubt about MySQL due to Oracle taking over the ownership. But if you ask me, I was more worried for MySQL because of MySQL itself. I've often said that if MySQL had been a healthy open source project - like the other 3 components in the LAMP stack - then most of the NoSQL technologies we've seen come about would never have been started as their own projects, because it would have

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Speaking at Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo 2012
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I’m speaking at Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo 2012. My two talk are: Getting Started with Drizzle 7.1 and Verifying MySQL Replication Safely With pt-table-checksum 2.0. No, there’s no relationship between those topics; they’re just things I know well.

I’ve been stalking Drizzle for many years. When it went GA last year, I began hacking Drizzle, focusing on plugins which give it nearly all its functionality. Recently, I helped overhaul the configuration,

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MySQL and PostgreSQL Cloud Offerings – linux.conf.au 2012 miniconf talk by myself and Selena
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Selena and I gave a talk on the various issues of running databases “in the cloud” at the recent linux.conf.au in Ballarat. Video is up, embedded below:

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