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10 Newer Entries Showing entries 121 to 130 of 803 10 Older Entries

Displaying posts with tag: innodb (reset)

Introducing TokuMX Clustering Indexes for MongoDB
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Since introducing TokuMX, we’ve discussed benefits that TokuMX has for existing MongoDB applications that require no changes. In this post, I introduce an extension we’ve made to the indexing API: clustering indexes, a tool that can tremendously improve query performance. If I were to speak to someone about clustering indexes, I think the conversation could …

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Making full table scan 10x faster in InnoDB
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At MySQL Connect 2013, I talked about how we used MySQL 5.6 at Facebook, and explained some of new features we added to our Facebook MySQL 5.6 source tree. In this post, I'm going to talk about how we made full table scan faster in InnoDB.

Faster full table scan in InnoDB In general, almost all queries from applications are using indexes, and reading very few rows (0..1 on primary key lookups and 0..hundreds on range scans). But sometimes we run full table scans. Typical full table scan examples are logical backups (mysqldump) and online schema …

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Inexpensive SSDs for Database Workloads
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The cost of SSDs has been dropping rapidly, and at the time of this writing, 2.5-drives have reached the 1TB capacity mark.  You can actually get inexpensive drives for as little as 60 cents per GB. Even inexpensive SSDs can perform tens of thousands of IOPs and come with 1.5M – 2M hous MTBF and a 5-year warranty: check out the Intel SC S3500 specs as an example. There is however one important factor you need to take into account when considering  SSDs as opposed to conventional hard drives – Write …

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InnoDB Temporary Tables just got faster
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It all started with a goal to make InnoDB temporary tables more effective. Temporary table semantics are blessed with some important characteristics that can help us simplify lot of operations.

  • Temporary tables are not visible across connections
  • Temporary tables lifetime is limited to connection lifetime (unless user explicitly drops it).

What does this means in to InnoDB ?

  • REDO logging can be avoided for temporary tables and related objects since temporary tables do not survive a shutdown or crash.
  • Temporary table definitions can be maintained in-memory without persisting to the …
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InnoDB 5.7 performance improvements
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A quick overview of the InnoDB performance improvements for both read-only and read-write loads.

It's all about bugs fixed: MySQL 5.6.14
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Most of MySQL gurus and famous users are probably in San Francisco now, getting ready for fun at MySQL Connect. Part of that fun should come from the announcement of great new MySQL 5.6.14 release (that somewhat silently happened yesterday).

I am sitting at home though and I've seen at best 3 sunny days in September. The rest of the time it rains, so hardly I can do anything more funny and useful than review of MySQL bug reports even during my weekend. Let me try to tell you what MySQL 5.6.14 is really about and what you should expect …

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InnoDB Redundant Row Format
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Introduction

This article describes the InnoDB redundant row format. If you are new to InnoDB code base (a new developer starting to work with InnoDB), then this article is for you. I'll explain the row format by making use of a gdb session. An overview of the article is given below:

  • Create a simple table and populate few rows.
  • Access the page that contains the rows inserted.
  • Access a couple of rows and explain its format.
  • Give summary of redundant row format.
  • Useful gdb commands to analyse the InnoDB rows.
  • Look at a GNU Emacs Lisp function to traverse rows in an InnoDB …
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How to move the InnoDB log sequence number (LSN) forward
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This post focuses on the problem of the InnoDB log sequence number being in the future.

Preface: What is an InnoDB log sequence number?

The Log sequence number (LSN) is an important database parameter used by InnoDB in many places.
The most important use is for crash recovery and buffer pool purge control.

Internally, the InnoDB LSN counter never goes backward.
And, when InnoDB writes 50 bytes to the redo logs, the LSN increases by 50 bytes.
As such we can count LSN in …


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How InnoDB promotes UNIQUE constraints
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The other day I was running pt-duplicate-key-checker on behalf of a customer and noticed some peculiar recommendations on an InnoDB table with an odd structure (no PRIMARY key, but multiple UNIQUE constraints). This got me thinking about how InnoDB promotes UNIQUE constraints to the role of PRIMARY KEYs. The documentation is pretty clear:

[DOCS]
When you define a PRIMARY KEY on your table, InnoDB uses it as the clustered index. …

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TokuDB vs InnoDB in timeseries INSERT benchmark
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This post is a continuation of my research of TokuDB’s  storage engine to understand if it is suitable for timeseries workloads.

While inserting LOAD DATA INFILE into an empty table shows great results for TokuDB, what’s more interesting is seeing some realistic workloads.

So this time let’s take a look at the INSERT benchmark.

What I am going to do is to …

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10 Newer Entries Showing entries 121 to 130 of 803 10 Older Entries

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