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Displaying posts with tag: innodb (reset)
New InnoDB Memcached Functionality in 5.7 Lab Release

InnoDB Memcached’s read only query performance in 5.7 has already achieved a remarkable 1.1 million QPS record. Now, the read only query bottleneck shifts to the memcached client itself. Thus anything that can batch the queries and shorten the query strings helps.

Multiple Get

In the new 5.7 InnoDB Lab Release, we add support for the “multi-get” option within InnoDB Memcached. This functionality enables users to send multiple keys in a single “get” command. In this way, for client-server communication, the package size is reduced as multiple keys are package within a single “get” call. For InnoDB, it will no longer need to start a transaction and open the table for each key if they are packaged …

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InnoDB Native Partitioning – Early Access

The InnoDB labs release includes a snapshot of the InnoDB Native Partitioning feature.

To better understand why we implemented this, we need to start with some background on tables, storage engines, and handlers. In MySQL an open instance of a table has a handler object as an interface to the table’s storage engine. For a partitioned table there is a main table handler that implements the partitioning feature, but for storage, each partition has its own handler. This worked fairly well, but the more partitions you had the more overhead from the per partition handlers. So to remove this overhead for partitioned InnoDB tables we’re introducing Native Partitioning support! This means a new InnoDB partitioning aware handler, so that we have a single handler object for a partitioned table and not one handler object per partition.

Let us create a simple table with 8k partitions:

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Visualizing the impact of ordered vs. random index insertion in InnoDB

[This post refers to innodb_ruby version 0.9.11 as of October 2, 2014.]

Many DBAs know that building indexes in “random” order (or really any order that greatly differs from ordered by key) can be much less efficient. However, it’s often hard to really understand why that is. With the “-illustrate” visualization modes available in innodb_ruby, it’s possible to quite easily visualize the structure of indexes. The space-lsn-age-illustrate mode to innodb_space allows visualization of all pages in a space file by “LSN age”, generating something like a heatmap of the space file based on how recently each page was modified.

(Note that a small Ruby script generate_data_simple.rb was used to generate the test tables used below. …

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Online Truncate of InnoDB UNDO Tablespaces

We have received a lot of requests from our user community regarding the ability to  truncate UNDO tablespaces (‘truncate’ here means that the size of the tablespace is reset back to what it was when it was first created). We are happy to say that we’ve now been able to implement this anticipated feature.

Introduction

The InnoDB UNDO tablespace(s) host rollback segments that hold rollback information related to database changes. This information is used to rollback a transaction and to retrieve the previous version of a record that has been updated or deleted for multi-version concurrency control (MVCC). Once a transaction is committed, InnoDB will discard the related UNDO log records. UNDO log records for updates or deletes will be kept around as long as there exists an open transaction that may access older versions of the records. When all such open transactions are committed then the associated UNDO log records can …

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About the Data Dictionary Labs Release

For a long time, the MySQL development community and many others have wanted a server that worked without FRM files.  The motivation behind removing FRM files, and the design goals around new data dictionary, can be explored in more detail in the blog post by Ståle Deraas “A New Data Dictionary for MySQL”.

And now for the good news! We have a MySQL Labs Release ready with a preview of the new Data Dictionary!

What is in the first MySQL Data Dictionary labs release?

First of all, the FRM files are now gone. The MySQL server no longer creates FRM files, ever. The server stores table meta-data in the data dictionary tables which use the InnoDB storage engine. For more details on the schema definitions of data dictionary tables, see …

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Today is the day in which MyISAM is no longer needed

Of course, this is just a catchy title. As far as I know not all system tables can be converted to InnoDB yet (e.g. grant tables), which makes the header technically false. MyISAM is a very simple engine, and that has some inherent advantages (no transactional overhead, easier to “edit” manually, usually less space footprint on disk), but also some very ugly disadvantages: not crash safe, no foreign keys, only full-table locks, consistency problems, bugs in for large tables,… The 5.7.5 “Milestone 15” release, presented today at the Oracle Open World has an impressive list of changes, which I will need some time to digest, like an in-development ( …

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More then 1000 columns – get transactional with TokuDB

Recently I encountered a specific situation in which a customer was forced to stay with the MyISAM engine due to a legacy application using tables with over 1000 columns. Unfortunately InnoDB has a limit at this point. I did not expect to hear this argument for MyISAM. It is usually about full text search or spatial indexes functionality that were missing in InnoDB, and which were introduced in MySQL 5.6 and 5.7, respectively, to let people forget about MyISAM. In this case though, InnoDB still could not be used, so I gave the TokuDB a try.

I’ve created a simple bash script to generate a SQL file with …

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The MySQL 5.7.5 Milestone Release is Available

The MySQL Development team is happy to announce our 5.7.5 development milestone release (DMR), now available for download at dev.mysql.com.  You can find the full list of changes and bug fixes in the 5.7.5 release notes.  Here are the highlights. Enjoy!

Scalability

Improve scalability by not using thr_lock locks for InnoDB tables (WL#6671) : This work by Dmitry Lenev improves InnoDB scalability by not using thr_lock locks for InnoDB tables. For InnoDB tables we now rely on MDL + InnoDB row locks. This patch shows good performance/scalability improvements in the single table Sysbench OLTP_RO/ POINT_SELECT tests for InnoDB on multi-core …

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Some current MySQL Architecture writings

So, I’ve been looking around for a while (and a few times now) for any good resources that cover a bunch of MySQL architecture and technical details aimed towards the technically proficient but not MySQL literate audience. I haven’t really found anything. I mean, there’s the (huge and very detailed) MySQL manual, there’s the MySQL Internals manual (which is sometimes only 10 years out of date) and there’s various blog entries around the place. So I thought I’d write something explaining roughly how it all fits together and what it does to your system (processes, threads, IO etc).(Basically, I’ve found myself explaining this enough times in the past few years that I should really write it down and just point people to my blog). I’ve linked to things for more reading. You should probably …

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OpenStack users shed light on Percona XtraDB Cluster deadlock issues

I was fortunate to attend an Ops discussion about databases at the OpenStack Summit Atlanta this past May as one of the panelists. The discussion was about deadlock issues OpenStack operators see with Percona XtraDB Cluster (of course this is applicable to any Galera-based solution). I asked to describe what they are seeing, and as it turned out, nova and neutron uses the SELECT … FOR UPDATE SQL construct quite heavily. This is a topic I thought was worth writing about.

Write set replication in a nutshell (with oversimplification)

Any node is writable, and replication happens in write sets. A write …

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