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Showing entries 1 to 30 of 319 Next 30 Older Entries

Displaying posts with tag: NoSQL (reset)

MySQLNoSQLCloud 2014 – Edition #3
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I’ve enjoyed visiting Buenos Aires once a year for the MySQLNoSQLCloud event, put together by the awesome people at Binlogic (in particular, their proprietor Santiago Lertora). It’s happening again in 2014, which by my count is the third edition, and there’s a twist: Buenos Aires on 13 & 14 November, and Cordoba on 17 November. It’s never been held in Cordoba before (like an annex event), so I think this could be extremely exciting.

If you’re looking to speak, send Santiago a note at events@binlogic.com (or leave a message here). I’ll put you in touch with him. If you’re looking to sponsor, you get attendees from all over Latin

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My experience with node and mongodb course "M101JS: MongoDB for Node.js Developers" (Third Week)
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Well, currently I am into the third week of mongodb node course "M101JS: MongoDB for Node.js Developers" and I am pretty enjoying it.

Lots of personal learning into node and mongodb.

The third week subject of "Patterns, Case Studies & Tradeoffs" is really interesting.

Here is a list of topics, I learned about:
- Mongodb rich documents concept.
- Mongodb schema use cases.
- Mongodb one:one, one:many, many:many use cases.
- How to select schema based on the usage like whether you want max performance
  or it may be a tradeoff.

One important point, I learned during the course is:
"While relational databases usually go for the normalised 3rd form so that data usage is agnostic to application, but mongodb schema arrangement is very closely related to application usage and varies accordingly."
SQL & NoSQL, The Best of Both Worlds with MySQL Cluster – webinar replay now available
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I recently presented a webinar explaining how you can enjoy the key benefits of NoSQL data stores without giving up all of the great features provided by a mature RDBMS.

In case you weren’t able to attend (or wanted to refresh your memory) then the webinar replay and charts (http://www.mysql.com/news-and-events/web-seminars/sql-nosql-the-best-of-both-worlds-with-mysql-cluster/" target="blank) are now available.

There’s often a lot of excitement around NoSQL Data Stores with the promise of simple

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On PostgreSQL. Interview with Bruce Momjian.
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“There are four things that motivate open source development teams:
1. The challenge/puzzle of programming, 2. Need for the software, 3. Personal advancement, 4. Belief in open source”
— Bruce Momjian.

On PostgreSQL and the challenges of motivating and managing open source teams, I have interviewed Bruce Momjian, Senior Database Architect at EnterpriseDB, and Co-founder of the PostgreSQL Global Development Group and Core Contributor.

RVZ

Q1. How did you manage to transform PostgreSQL from an abandoned academic project into a commercially viable, now enterprise relational database?


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I’m speaking at OUG Scotland this week
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If you’re going to be near Edinburgh this week then consider registering for OUG Scotland. I’ll be presenting on how to acheive the benefits of NoSQL (scalability, HA, ease of use. simple APIs) while at the same time still benefiting from the RDBMS features people have grown to rely on (ACID transactions, rich schemas, flexible access patterns) – the presentation will be at 11:25 on Wednesday as part of the developers’ track.

Hint for those that can’t make it – MySQL Cluster is the key

Still the best way to explain NoSQL
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Those in the MySQL/Drizzle world have probably seen this a bunch of times before, but I think it still holds up (now five years later) as one of the best NoSQL explanations around.

MySQL & NoSQL – Best of Both Worlds. Upcoming webinar
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On Thursday 22nd May I’ll be hosting a webinar explaining how you can get the best from the NoSQL world while still getting all of the benefits of a proven RDBMS. As always the webinar is free but please register here (http://www.mysql.com/news-and-events/web-seminars/sql-nosql-the-best-of-both-worlds-with-mysql-cluster/" target="blank).

There’s often a lot of excitement around NoSQL Data Stores with the promise of simple access patterns, flexible schemas, scalability and High Availability. The downside can come in the form of losing ACID transactions, consistency, flexible queries and

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Thoughts on Small Datum – Part 3
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Background: If you did not read my first blog post about why I am sharing my thoughts on the benchmarks published by Mark Callaghan on Small Datum you may want to skim through it now for a little context: Thoughts on Small Datum – Part 1”

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Last time, in Thoughts on Small Datum – Part 2 I shared my cliff notes and a graph on Mark Callaghan’s (@markcallaghan) March 11th insertion rate benchmarks using flash storage media. In those tests he compares MySQL (http://www.mysql.com/) outfitted with the

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Eventual consistency of NoSQL marketing
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Yesterday I learnt an important lesson about an important difference between NoSQL and MySQL, at least when it comes to the marketing and hype.

I saw a tweet from around marketing of one of NoSQL leaders:

Most people apparently would just conclude from the tweet's text, however I actually clicked the link, and couldn't believe eyes:

I guess that in NoSQL, when it comes to the integrity of data as well as hype - it is eventually consistent...



Use MySQL to store NoSQL and SQL data in the same database using memcached and InnoDB
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MySQL (http://mysql.com) is a great relational database, but at some point someone (management) in your company is probably going to say that they need to use NoSQL to store their data. After all, NoSQL is one of the latest buzzwords, so it must be good (correct?). Basically, NoSQL allows you to store data without all of the characteristics of a relational database. A very simple explanation is that you are storing all of a data set with just one primary key, and the primary key is how you also retrieve the data. While NoSQL may be good in some cases, it is hard to beat “old-fashioned” SQL relational databases – especially if that is what you know. But, with MySQL and InnoDB, you can have the best of both worlds.

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Maybe You Should Try Taking a Walk in My Shoes
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The title of this post should really be, “Maybe He Should Try Taking a Walk in Your Shoes.”

The he I’m referring to is economist and author, Tim Harford. The you is the people who use NewSQL and NoSQL approaches to mine big data with database platforms like MySQL (http://www.mysql.com" target="_blank) and MongoDB (or, preferably, our high-performance distributions of them, TokuDB and TokuMX).

Why should Mr. Harford take that walk? Well, he recently

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Explaining the case for MySQL
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My faithful readers, please spare 10 mins of your time, and read Baron's excellent post: https://vividcortex.com/blog/2014/04/30/why-mysql

Nuff said.


Since I can't really shut up, and only if you do like my (humble) take on this, I could say in short:

Every technology/platform/framework I choose, will end up surprising me, limiting me for things can be done easily, and throw many painful challenges at me if and when I need to do things that are closer to the platform's "edges". This is true for everything including Rails, JEE, Hibernate, MongoDB, MySQL.

I've learned that the more mature, generically-capable, transparent and ecosystem-rich a solution is - the less painful surprises for me in the worst timings - and more successful I am in my job.

Thoughts on Small Datum – Part 2
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If you did not read my first blog post about Mark Callaghan’s (@markcallaghan) benchmarks as documented in his blog, Small Datum, you may want to skim through it now for a little context.

——————-

On March 11th, Mark, a former Google and now Facebook database guru, published an insertion rate benchmark comparing MySQL (http://www.mysql.com) outfitted with the InnoDB storage engine with two NoSQL alternatives — basic MongoDB and TokuMX (the Tokutek high-performance

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Developing with MySQL and NoSQL
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MySQL adopts a very different approach to 'NoSQL' than other databases. With the memcached plugin, MySQL provides the speed and high availability benefits of a standard 'NoSQL' database solution, while mitigating many of the drawbacks to this approach.

A traditional memcached application bypasses the SQL layer entirely, and stores all its data in memory. This makes data access extremely fast, but there is a risk that the data will disappear in the event of a system problem. 

The MySQL memcached plugin for InnoDB also bypasses the SQL and optimization layers, resulting in excellent performance. It goes further, writing key-value data directly to  InnoDB tables. The result is fast data access while retaining the advantages provided by the existing relational database infrastructure, such as the ability to run complex queries with SQL, maintain data

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Reflections on return to MySQL Community and Ecosystem
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After a four year hiatus, my participation in last week’s Percona Live MySQL Users conference marked my official return to the MySQL Community and Ecosystem. As with earlier renditions this year’s “UC” was very well attended with a healthy mix of familiar faces and new blood, all coming together to discuss, present and explore the boundaries of the most popular and widely used open source database on the planet.  There were many good, informative keynote and technical sessions, BoFs and the exhibit hall was packed most of the operating hours with those interested in what the MySQL ecosystem is up to.  I also found it very refreshing that Oracle was among the most active in presenting useful technical content around their current and future MySQL open source product releases. All in  [Read more...]
Reports exaggerated
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I've been letting the blog rest recently, and not so recently as well.  The problem is not a lack of subjects, but a lack of time to do them any justice.  However it is quite sad to see that my last entry was in September 2012, so it is time to post again.

Of late I have been pondering what I have to say about :
  • Distributed MVCC and write-scaling
  • Different approaches to eventual consistency with replicated RDBMS
  • Various MySQL Cluster related topics
  • Various general rambling and unstructured topics
However, these will take some time to percolate and calcify.

In the meantime here are some things I have found interesting recently :






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Big Data: Three questions to Aerospike.
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“Many tools now exist to run database software without installing software. From vagrant boxes, to one click cloud install, to a cloud service that doesn’t require any installation, developer ease of use has always been a path to storage platform success.”–Brian Bulkowski.

The fifth interview in the “Big Data: three questions to “ series of interviews, is with Brian Bulkowski, Aerospike co-founder and CTO.

RVZ

Q1. What is your current product offering?

Brian Bulkowski: Aerospike is the first in-memory NoSQL database optimized for flash or solid state drives (SSDs).
In-memory for speed and NoSQL for scale. Our

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Why I Love Open Source
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Anders Karlsson wrote about Some myths on Open Source, the way I see it a few days ago.  Anders' article is mostly focused on exploding the idea that open source magically creates high quality code.  It is sad to say you do not have to look very far to see how true this is.

While I largely agree with Anders' points, there is far more that could be said on this subject, especially on the benefits of open source. I love working on open source software. Here are three reasons that are especially important to me.

1.) Open source is a great way to disseminate technology to users.  In the best cases, it is this easy to get open source products up and running:

$ sudo apt-get install software-i-want-to-use

A lot







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Are SQL Databases Dead?
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I like the image of this city of Mesa Verde. It’s fascinating to see how ancient cities were built, especially as an inhabitant of one of the worlds largest cities today, New York. I’m a long time relational database guy. I worked at scores of dot-coms in the 90′s as an old-guard Oracle DBA, and […]
The USA's healthcare.gov site and LAMP
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The USA's health care exchange site, healthcare.gov, has had well-publicized initial woes.

The New York Times has said one of the problems was the government's choice of DBMS, namely MarkLogic. A MarkLogic employee has said that "If the exact same processes and analysis were applied to a LAMP stack or an Oracle Exa-stack, the results would have likely been the same."

I don't know why he picked Exastack for comparison, but I too have wondered whether things would have been different if the American government had chosen a LAMP component (MySQL or MariaDB) as a DBMS, instead of MarkLogic.

What is MarkLogic?

The company is a software firm founded in 2001 based in San Carlos California. It has

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MySQL 5.7 : Over 1M QPS with InnoDB Memcached Plugin
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Or I could place in the title – “Yes, we done it!”

After reaching 500K QPS in Read-Only on SQL queries, it was natural to expect a much higher performance level from InnoDB Memcached Plugin which is by-passing all SQL related layers.. However the story is not simple, and yet far from finished

While for today we have already our first “preview” results showing that we’re able to reach over 1,000,000 Query/sec level with the latest MySQL 5.7 code:

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Log Buffer #346, A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Economist says that Physics suggest that storms will get worse as the planet warms. Typhoon Haiyan in Philippines, bush-fires in Australia, floods in China, and extreme unpredictable weather across the planet is a sober reminder. Good news is that technology and awareness is rising, and so is the data. Database technologies are playing their part to intelligently store that data and enabling the stakeholders to analyze and get meaningful results to predict and counter the extreme conditions. This Log Buffer Edition appreciates these efforts.

Big Data:

Big Data Tools that You Need to Know About – Hadoop & NoSQL.

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Big Data Tools that You Need to Know About – Hadoop & NoSQL – Part 2
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In the previous article we introduced Hadoop as the most popular Big Data toolset on the market today. We had just started talking about MapReduce as the major framework that makes Hadoop distinctive. So let’s continue the discussion where we left off.

 

MapReduce is really the key to understanding Hadoop’s parallel processing functionality as it enables data in various formats (XML, text, binary, log, SQL, ect) to be divided up and mapped out to many computers nodes and then recombined back to produce a final data set.

 

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Mixing databases usually not optimal
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Dan McKinley (Etsy) wrote an [IMHO] insightful article Why MongoDB Never Worked at Etsy.

First off, it’s important to realise that it’s not a snipe at MongoDB – it’s a fine tool.

The lessons are related to mixing multiple databases in a deployment (administration and monitoring overhead) and the acknowledgement that issues of schema design, scalability and maintenance need attention regardless of which brand or technology you pick for your database. That comes back to the old insight that migrations are rarely worth it (regardless of what you migrate to what).

I think these are indeed important considerations as they have a major impact on the ongoing costs of your entire environment (production as well as development and testing) – these days we

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The Third Most Popular Open Source DBMS
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We all know that MySQL says it is "the world's most popular open-source database" (http://www.mysql.com). And PostgreSQL has a firm hold on second place while claiming to be, instead, "the world's most advanced open source database". But the horse that comes in third can return some money to gamblers who bet "to show". And the horse that shows momentum or gets close is worth watching for next time.

So I'll just ignore the dolphin and the elephant in the room, and go on to a harder question: who's number three?

According to Wikipedia

To find out how many times someone has expressed interest in a topic, I can go to stats.grok.se and ask how many times someone has looked at that topic's page in Wikipedia. Evil-thinking people could manipulate these numbers with ease, but until

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Data Analytics at NBCUniversal. Interview with Matthew Eric Bassett.
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“The most valuable thing I’ve learned in this role is that judicious use of a little bit of knowledge can go a long way. I’ve seen colleagues and other companies get caught up in the “Big Data” craze by spend hundreds of thousands of pounds sterling on a Hadoop cluster that sees a few megabytes [...]
Lock Diagnostics and Index Usage Statistics in TokuMX v1.2.1
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TokuMX v1.2.1 introduces two simple new features to help you understand the performance characteristics of your database: lock diagnostics and index usage statistics. We’d like to take you through a few examples of what these features are and how to use them.

Lock Diagnostics

Since we introduced TokuMX, one of the most frequent complaints has been about “lock not granted” errors.  These arise when a long-running operation takes document-level locks, and other clients timeout while waiting to acquire the same locks.

This is a new problem in TokuMX that doesn’t exist in MongoDB, because MongoDB

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Webinar Replay + Q&A – Developing JavaScript Applications for Node.js with MySQL and NoSQL
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On Thursday 12th September I co-presented a webinar on how MySQL Cluster delivers the key benefits of NoSQL Data Stores without having to give up the features that people rely on from relational databases (consistency, SQL etc.). There was a particular focus on how to use the new node.js JavaScript API which was recently released as part of MySQL Cluster 7.3. If you weren’t able to attend the live event then the webinar replay is available here (http://www.mysql.com/news-and-events/on-demand-webinars/#en-20-28"

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Webinar – Developing JavaScript Applications for Node.js with MySQL and NoSQL
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Note that the webinar replay + transcript of the Questions and Answers is now available from here.

On Thursday 12th September I’ll be co-presenting a free webinar on how MySQL Cluster delivers the key benefits of NoSQL Data Stores without having to give up the features that people rely on from relational databases (consistency, SQL etc.). There will be particular

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Big Data from Space: the “Herschel” telescope.
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” One of the biggest challenges with any project of such a long duration is coping with change. There are many aspects to coping with change, including changes in requirements, changes in technology, vendor stability, changes in staffing and so on”–Jon Brumfitt. On May 14, 2009, the European Space Agency launched an Arianne 5 rocket [...]
Showing entries 1 to 30 of 319 Next 30 Older Entries

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