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Displaying posts with tag: source (reset)

How to execute mysql query from a file in your mysql client terminal?
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Being a terminal fan myself, I usually find myself running queries in the mysql client instead of a UI interface as it is much faster. You get to see the results instantaneously.

One thing which is pretty tedious is editing a big query again after once running it as the whole multi-line formatted query now appears on a single line, thus reducing its readability.

But no problems, you can edit your query from a file and run the file from your mysql client terminal as many times as you want with as many edits.

To do so, follow the below steps:

1. Open your terminal and cd into the folder you want to store our sample mysql file. Then save your query in a sample file called my_query.sql

$ cd /path/to/folder
$ vim my_query.sql

Save a sample query like:

SELECT *














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PHP 5.3.4 and MySQL 5.5.8 GA (libmysql)
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As you are probably aware, PHP 5.3.4 does not compile with MySQL 5.5 GA (http://www.mysql.com/why-mysql/white-papers/mysql-wp-whatsnew-mysql-55.php). The details can be seen in MySQL bug queue. Basically, the problem boils down to incorrect installation of MySQL headers. MySQL 5.5 build system does not install the headers under the include-prefix/mysql directly but instead installs under the include-prefix directory itself. So, when the PHP build system looks for the MySQL (http://mysql.com/) headers, it cannot find <mysql/psi/mysql_thread.h> and so forth.

What is the fix?

The MySQL dev team

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Downloading, compiling, and installing MySQL Server from source code
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If you are running any GNU/Linux server operating system like RHEL 5 or CentOS 5, you may probably install MySQL server that comes with the operating system packages either during the initial setup or later using yum(8). The advantage being addition/removal of packages either using the GUI package manager or rpm(8), yum(8). Fair enough. But unfortunately the MySQL package (mysql-server) that comes bundled with RHEL 5.5 or CentOS 5.5 is fairly old (5.0.77). What if you want to install the latest stable version of MySQL yet have the advantage of removing/re-installing the software using rpm(8)?

In this blog post, I will guide you with compiling MySQL from source code yet installing the software through rpm(8) so that we tune and

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Downloading, compiling, and installing MySQL Server from source code
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This content has been updated and moved to a new place.


If you are running any GNU/Linux server operating system like RHEL 5 or CentOS 5, you may probably install MySQL server that comes with the operating system packages either during the initial setup or later using yum(8). The advantage being addition/removal of packages either using the GUI package manager or rpm(8), yum(8). Fair enough. But unfortunately the MySQL package (mysql-server) that comes bundled with RHEL 5.5 or CentOS 5.5 is fairly old (5.0.77). What if you want to install the latest stable version of MySQL yet have the advantage of removing/re-installing the software using rpm(8)?


In this blog post, I will guide you with compiling MySQL from source code yet installing the software through rpm(8) so that we tune and



  [Read more...]
Open source or Open Core or Commercial... Does it matter??
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This is my 2 cents in the Open Source vs. Open Code vs. Commercial debate. And it's a long one...

Maybe some of you reading this are offended already, but bear with me, I'll get there. The way I see the Open Source model, having worked with OSS at MySQL for 6+ years now, is that this is a great way of developing software. Not brilliant, but great, but I'll get there also.

Users of OSS, in my mind, are OSS users for one or more of three reasons:
  • It's Open - The users using OSS for this reason believes that being open is in and of itself a great thing, enough so to use OSS even when non-OSS is less expensive and/or better.
  • Cost - OSS is typically less expensive than non-OSS, and this is the reason these users get here. There are then 2 subgroups here, one that represents users that just aren't funded at all, many websites





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GRAPH Engine Linux binaries in MySQL 5.0.86-d10 available now
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At this point we have a 32-bit and a 64-bit Linux binary tarball, should work on most Ubuntu and CentOS and the like (I tested a few). Possibly OSX coming. Not sure on Windows right now.

For further details and download links, see yesterday’s release post.

GRAPH Engine source in MySQL 5.0.86-d10 available now
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It’s time to play! A special thanks particularly to Antony Curtis for the excellent smart and actually very speedy coding, and for just being a great guy to work with. If you would like to utilise his ace MySQL knowledge and coding skills, do talk to me!

Right now, we have a source tarball available for you, patching OQGRAPH on top of a MySQL 5.0.86-d9-Sail (OurDelta) source. As you know MySQL 5.0 does not have engine plugins so patching is the only way we can put it in. This OQGRAPH codebase is licensed under GPLv2+.

Even though we’ve successfully built it on several platforms and architectures, since this is the first public release we’d like you to try it first, as we’re sure that there might be problems on some platforms. When we catch and fix those, we can do proper

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Finding the source for MySQL 5.4
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In order to really check what currently has made it into 5.4(there has been rumors...) I wanted to branch the code and see for myself.

Couldn't find it at first in our internal code repository since it's actually not named 5.4 there yet. Fortunately it's also pushed out to launchpad, that means you can easily get a copy of the code using bazaar

$> bzr branch lp:mysql-server/5.4

There is of course also tar balls available from our download page
http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/mysql/5.4.html#source

Anyone curious about what our internal name is? :)
The pursuit of openness
Employee +4 Vote Up -2Vote Down

When I joined MySQL in 2006, after several profitable years as a consultant, I had a dream. I wanted to improve the product that had contributed to my professional success.

The first thing that I learned when I started the uphill task is that it was far more difficult than expected. MySQL called itself open source, but the development practices were for all practical purposes closed source. At the same time, I found that MySQL, below the surface, is an organization with complex and well oiled engineering practices.

Indeed, opening up the cathedral, as Lenz put it, was a hard nut to crack. We had a closed source revision control system, and our developers loved it so much, that any proposal to change it was met with strong opposition. We discussed technical matters behind the firewall. Our code review process, although technically demanding and very thorough, was kept

  [Read more...]
The pursuit of openness
Employee +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down

When I joined MySQL in 2006, after several profitable years as a consultant, I had a dream. I wanted to improve the product that had contributed to my professional success.

The first thing that I learned when I started the uphill task is that it was far more difficult than expected. MySQL called itself open source, but the development practices were for all practical purposes closed source. At the same time, I found that MySQL, below the surface, is an organization with complex and well oiled engineering practices.

Indeed, opening up the cathedral, as Lenz put it, was a hard nut to crack. We had a closed source revision control system, and our developers loved it so much, that any proposal to change it was met with strong opposition. We discussed technical matters behind the firewall. Our code review process, although technically demanding and very thorough, was

  [Read more...]
Showing entries 1 to 10 of 44 10 Older Entries

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