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Showing entries 1 to 30 of 73 Next 30 Older Entries

Displaying posts with tag: Scripts (reset)

Bash script: report largest InnoDB files
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The following script will report the largest InnoDB tables under the data directory: schema, table & length in bytes. The tables could be non-partitioned, in which case this is simply the size of the corresponding .ibd file, or they can be partitioned, in which case the reported size is the sum of all partition files. It is assumed tables reside in their own tablespace files, i.e. created with innodb_file_per_table=1.

(
    mysql_datadir=$(grep datadir /etc/my.cnf | cut -d "=" -f 2)
    cd $mysql_datadir
    for frm_file in $(find . -name "*.frm")
    do
        tbl_file=${frm_file//.frm/.ibd}
        table_schema=$(echo $frm_file | cut -d "/" -f 2)
        table_name=$(echo $frm_file | cut -d "/" -f 3 | cut -d "." -f 1)
        if [ -f $tbl_file ]
        then
  [Read more...]
common_schema: 1.3: security goodies, parameterized split(), json-to-xml, query checksum
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common_schema 1.3 is released and is available for download. New and noteworthy in this version:

  • Parameterized split(): take further control over huge transactions by breaking them down into smaller chunks, now manually tunable if needed
  • duplicate_grantee(): copy+paste existing accounts along with their full set of privileges
  • similar_grants: find which accounts share the
  [Read more...]
Super Python: three applications involving IRC bot master, MySQL optimization, and Website stress testing.
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In my ongoing efforts to migrate my fun side projects and coding experiments from SVN to Git I’ve come across some of my favorite Python based apps – which are all available in their respective repos on BitBucket, as follows:

IRC Bot Commander

  • What it does: it’s an IRC bot that takes commands and does your bidding on whichever remote server the bot is installed on.
  • How it does it: the bot runs on whatever server you install it on, then it connects to the IRC server and channel you configured it to connect to and it waits for you to give it commands, then it execs the commands and returns the output to your IRC chat window.
  [Read more...]
common_schema over traditional scripts
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If you are familiar with both openark kit and common_schema, you'll notice I've incorporated some functionality already working in openark kit into common_schema, essentially rewriting what used to be a Python script into SQL/QueryScript.

What was my reasoning for rewriting good code? I wish to explain that, and provide with a couple examples.

I'm generally interested in pushing as much functionality into the MySQL server. When using an external script, one:

  • Needs the right dependencies (OS, Perl/Python version, Perl/Python modules).
  • Needs to provide with connection params,
  • Needs to get acquainted with a lot
  [Read more...]
Simple jQuery: how to validate IPv4 addresses and netmasks
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Unfortunately jQuery doesn’t come with default form validation to check for ip-addresses or subnet masking. So without a long winded explanation here’s the code. Just include this as a separate JS file like the rest of your page’s JS.

// 'ipv4': IPv4 Address Validator
$.validator.addMethod('ipv4', function(value) {
    var ipv4 = /^[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}$/;    
    return value.match(ipv4);
}, 'Invalid IPv4 address');

// 'netmask': IPv4 Netmask Validator
$.validator.addMethod('netmask', function(value) {
    var mask = /^[1-2]{1}[2,4,5,9]{1}[0,2,4,5,8]{1}\.
[0-2]{1}[0,2,4,5,9]{1}[0,2,4,5,8]{1}\.
[0-2]{1}[0,2,4,5,9]{1}[0,2,4,5,8]{1}\.
[0-9]{1,3}$/;    
    return value.match(mask);
}, 'Invalid IPv4 netmask');

You can use it like this.

$("#myform_here").validate({
    rules:{
	ipaddress:{
  [Read more...]
Killing InnoDB idle transactions
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The issue of terminating long-time idle open InnoDB transaction has been discussed recently by many. I wish to add my share, by proposing a quick and clean solution via common_schema.

common_schema 1.2 provides with the innodb_transactions view, which relies on INNODB_TRX - one of the InnoDB Plugin views in INFORMATION_SCHEMA - as well as on PROCESSLIST, and so is able to determine with certainty that a transaction has been idle for a long time.

innodb_transactions offers us with a sql_kill_query column, which produces a 'KILL QUERY 12345' type of value. So we

  [Read more...]
Simple MySQL: using TRIGGERs to keep datetime columns updated without direct SQL calls
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If you’ve ever used non-opensource code, or applications that you don’t have complete control over, then you may have run into situations you need to alter data on a per-row basis but been unable to do so for lack of application SQL access. The solution to this type of problem is to use a MySQL TRIGGER, which allows us to execute arbitrary SQL commands when defined events occur. Why is this useful and how does it work? Well…

For example, I have a freeRADIUS server that uses MySQL as a backend for the user authentication, and one of my server applications (HostBill) provides a freeRADIUS plugin that allows my users to manage their RADIUS accounts; however the default freeRADIUS schema lacks a DATETIME column on the user table. When a user is created (INSERT) or has their password changed (UPDATE)

  [Read more...]
Purging old rows with QueryScript: three use cases
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Problem: you need to purge old rows from a table. This may be your weekly/monthly cleanup task. The table is large, the amount of rows to be deleted is large, and doing so in one big DELETE is too heavy.

You can use oak-chunk-update or pt-archiver to accomplish the task. You can also use server side scripting with QueryScript, offering a very simple syntax with no external scripting, dependencies and command line options.

I wish to present three cases of row deletion, with three different solutions. In all cases we assume some TIMESTAMP column

  [Read more...]
OpenCode: MySQL procedures + python + shell code repositories now public
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I write a fair number of scripts on this site and have posted a lot of code over the years. Generally if I am not pasting the code to be viewed on the webpage then I link to a file that a user can download; which leads to a lot of mish-mash code that doesn’t have a home. I’ve always kept the code files in a private SVN repo over the years but have recently moved them all to BitBucket Git repositories. So here they are: lots of code samples and useful bits of programming to save time.

Generic Shell Scripts: https://bitbucket.org/themattreid/generic-bash-scripts/src
Generic Python Scripts: https://bitbucket.org/themattreid/generic-python-scripts/src
Generic MySQL Stored Procs:

  [Read more...]
Experimenting with 5.6 InnoDB Online DDL (bugs included)
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MySQL 5.6 offers the groundbreaking online DDL operations for InnoDB. Most common use cases will enjoy this feature, and the need for online alter table scripts will decrease. This is a killer feature!

I've put this new feature to the usability test. How did it go? Not too well, I'm afraid.

[Updates to this text inline], also see this followup.

sakila & DDL

sakila is still a very useful database. I say "still" because it is not very large, and computing power is getting stronger; yet on my laptop some operations can still take many seconds to

  [Read more...]
Simple MySQL: Converting ANSI SQL to SQLite3
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I was digging through some old project code and found this script. Sometimes one finds oneself in an odd situation and needs to convert regular SQL, say from a MySQL database dump, into SQLite3 format. There’s not too much else to say, but here is a script that helps with the process. It can likely be improved but this handles the items that came up during conversion on initial runs.

#!/bin/sh
####
# NAME: convert-mysql-to-sqlite3.sh
# AUTHOR: Matt Reid
# DATE: 2011-03-22
# LICENSE: BSD
####
if [ "x$1" == "x" ]; then
   echo "Usage: $0 "
   exit 
fi 
cat $1 |
grep -v ' KEY "' |   
grep -v ' UNIQUE KEY "' |
grep -v ' PRIMARY KEY ' |
sed '/^SET/d' |          
sed 's/ unsigned / /g' | 
sed 's/ auto_increment/ primary key autoincrement/g' |
sed 's/ smallint([0-9]*) / integer /g' | 
sed 's/ tinyint([0-9]*) / integer /g' |  
sed 's/ int([0-9]*) / integer /g' |      
sed 's/
  [Read more...]
How common_schema split()s tables - internals
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This post exposes some of the internals, and the SQL behind QueryScript's split. common_schema/QueryScript 1.1 introduces the split statement, which auto-breaks a "large" query (one which operates on large tables as a whole or without keys) into smaller queries, and executes them in sequence.

This makes for easier transactions, less locks held, potentially (depending on the user) more idle time released back to the database. split has similar concepts to oak-chunk-update and

  [Read more...]
Table split(...) for the masses
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(pun intended)

common_schema's new split statement (see release announcement) auto-splits complex queries over large tables into smaller ones: instead of issuing one huge query, split breaks one's query into smaller queries, each working on a different set of rows (a chunk).

Thus, it is possible to avoid holding locks for long times, allowing for smaller transactions. It also makes for breathing space for the RDBMS, at times boosting operation speed, and at times prolonging operation speed at will.

In this post I show how split exposes itself to the user, should the user wish so.

split can

  [Read more...]
common_schema 1.1 released: split(), try-catch, killall(), profiling
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I'm very happy to announce the release of common_schema, version 1.1 (revision 300).

This version boasts with compelling new features: innovative QueryScript syntax, libraries, views which add to your skills as a DBA, making some maintenance and management tasks a breeze.

  • QueryScript, split statement: automagically break long queries into smaller chunks, avoid long locks and reduce query/transaction overhead
  • QueryScript, try-catch statement: just try { something; } catch { act_on_error; }.
  • killall(): quickly kill connections based on grantee/user/host information.
  • profiling/profiling_last: utility views to assist in query
  [Read more...]
MySQL: a convenient stored procedure for memory usage reporting
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If you’ve ever been troubleshooting on the MySQL command line and needed to quickly see how much memory is being used then you’ve probably noticed that there are no built in commands to give you this data. Unlike other enterprise databases MySQL doesn’t have a very robust management system built in to help make the DBA’s life easier. It doesn’t come with built in Stored Procedures to report on usage statistics or generate handy reports; so we have to code them and import them to MySQL — no relying on Oracle to help us out here.

So, here’s a stored procedure that can be imported to MySQL and run whenever you need to see the memory usage statistics. Installation and usage info is built into the SP below. The SP can also be downloaded from the repo:

  [Read more...]
Water the lawn if temperature exceeded 80 degrees
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I read somewhere that you should do extra watering of lawn (after sunset), if the temperature exceeded 80° F during the day.

So, a really quick hack works like this:

A bash script
#!/bin/bash

TEMP="`/usr/bin/mysql -ss open2300 -e \"SELECT FLOOR(MAX(temp_out)) FROM weather GROUP BY (rec_date) ORDER BY rec_date DESC LIMIT 1;\"`"
if [ "$TEMP" -ge 80 ]; then
/root/water-on.exp
/root/water2.exp 120 1
/root/water3.exp 120 1
fi

read more

TunnelMaker, a simple script to generate multi-hop SSH tunnels
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SSH tunnels provide a very effective means to access remote services and applications. Not only does it provide encryption of data between hosts, but it allows you to route connections between a sequence of servers, thus chaining connections. A common use of this method is to provide encrypted connections to MySQL servers so that user accounts can be limited to only “localhost” privileges, yet accessed from remote workstations without having to run MySQL+SSL.

The concept is simple, for example let’s say you have three servers: localhost (your workstation in America), a server in Europe, and a server in Japan. You want to access Apache running on port 80 on the Japan server but because of firewall restrictions you cannot access port 80 remotely, and to make things more difficult the Japan server only allows SSH connections from the Europe server’s IP. We can

  [Read more...]
Fun with Bash :: one liners
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Here are some quick and easy bash commands to solve every day problems I run into. Comment and leave some of your own if you like. I might update this post with new ones over time. These are just some common ones.

Iterate through directory listing and remove the file extension from each file
ls -1 | while read each; do new=`echo $each |sed 's/\(.*\)\..*/\1/'` && echo $new && mv "$each" "$new"; done

Output relevant process info, and nothing else
ps axo "user,pid,ppid,%cpu,%mem,tty,stime,state,command"| grep -v "grep" | grep $your-string-here

Setup a SOCKS5 proxy on localhost port 5050, to tunnel all traffic through a destination server
ssh -N -D 5050 username@destination_server'

Setup a SOCKS5 proxy via a remote TOR connection, using local port 5050 and remote TOR port 9050
ssh -L 5050:127.0.0.1:9050 username@destination_server'

Display text or code file
  [Read more...]
MySQL/QueryScript use case: DELETE all but top N records per group
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Some administrative tasks can be simplified by using common_schema/QueryScript. I'm collecting a bunch of these for documentation. Here's one for example:

The DBA/developer has the task of retaining only top 3 most populated countries per continent. That is, she has to DELETE 4th, 5th, 6th, ... most populated counties in each continent.

Is it possible to work out with a single query? Yes. But the query is not pretty. In fact, it is quite complicated, and either involves unintuitive subqueries, or unintuitive hacks. A normal DBA would not want to write, neither maintain this kind of query, unless top-notch-geek, which

  [Read more...]
common_schema rev. 218: QueryScript, throttling, processes, documentation
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common_schema, revision 218 is released, with major new features, top one being server side scripting. Here are the highlights:

  • QueryScript: server side scripting is now supported by common_schema, which acts as an interpreter for QueryScript code.
  • Throttling for queries is now made available via the throttle() function.
  • Enhancements to processlist-related views, including the new slave_hosts view.
  • Inline documentation/help is available via the help() routine.
  • more...

QueryScript

common_schema makes for a QueryScript implementation for MySQL. You can run server side

  [Read more...]
QueryScript: SQL scripting language
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Introducing QueryScript: a programming language aimed for SQL scripting, seamlessly combining scripting power such as flow control & variables with standard SQL statements or RDBMS-specific commands.

QueryScript is available fro MySQL via common_schema, which adds MySQL-specific usage.

What does QueryScript look like? Here are a few code samples:

Turn a bulk DELETE operation into smaller tasks. Throttle in between.

while (DELETE FROM archive.events WHERE ts < CURDATE() LIMIT 1000)
{
  throttle 2;
}

Convert all InnoDB tables in the 'sakila' database to compressed format:

foreach ($table, $schema, $engine: table in sakila)
{
  if ($engine = 'InnoDB')
    ALTER TABLE
  [Read more...]
MySQL command line vs. visual editors
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Students in my training classes usually prefer to use some kind of visual editor for MySQL. Typically this would be the software they're using at work. Sometimes they just bring over their laptops with the software installed. Or they would use MySQL Workbench, which is what I usually have pre-installed on their desktops.

I see MySQL Workbench, SQLyog, Toad for MySQL, or several more.

I always humbly suggest they close down their software and open up a command line.

It isn't fancy. It may not even be convenient (especially on Windows, in my opinion). And repeating your last command with a minor modification requires a lot of key stroking. Or you would copy+paste from some text editor. Most students will give it a shot, then go back to their favorite editor.

Well, again and again I reach the same conclusion:

Visual editors are not as  [Read more...]

More MySQL foreach()
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In my previous post I've shown several generic use cases for foreach(), a new scripting functionality introduced in common_schema.

In this part I present DBA's handy syntax for schema and table operations and maintenance.

Confession: while I love INFORMATION_SCHEMA's power, I just hate writing queries against it. It's just so much typing! Just getting the list of tables in a schema makes for this heavy duty query:

SELECT TABLE_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES WHERE TABLE_SCHEMA='sakila' AND TABLE_TYPE='BASE TABLE';

When a join is involved this really becomes a nightmare. I think it's

  [Read more...]
MySQL foreach()
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A new routine is now available in common_schema, which makes for an easier execution syntax for some operations:

foreach(collection_to_iterate_over, queries_to_execute_per_iteration_step);

To illustrate what it can do, consider:

call foreach('table in sakila', 'ALTER TABLE ${schema}.${table} ENGINE=InnoDB ROW_FORMAT=COMPACT');

call $('schema like shard_%', 'CREATE TABLE ${schema}.messages (id INT)');

call $('2000:2009', 'INSERT IGNORE INTO report (report_year) VALUES (${1})');

$() stands as a synonym to foreach(). I suspect it should look familiar to web programmers.

The idea for foreach() was introduced by Giuseppe Maxia during a

  [Read more...]
Test-driven SQL development
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I'm having a lot of fun writing common_schema, an SQL project which includes views, tables and stored routines.

As the project grows (and it's taking some interesting directions, in my opinion) more dependencies are being introduced, and a change to one routine or view may affect many others. This is why I've turned the development on common_schema to be test driven.

Now, just how do you test drive an SQL project?

Well, much like the way you test any other project in your favorite programming language. If its functions you're testing, that's all too familiar: functions get some input and provide some output. Hmmm, they might be changing SQL data during that time. With procedures it's slightly more complex, since they do not directly return output but result sets.

Here's the testing scheme

  [Read more...]
MySQL HA Agent Mini HowTo
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Why This Post


While testing Yoshinori Matsunobo's MHA agent I found that although the wiki has a very complete documentation, it was missing a some details. This article intends to close that gap and bring up some issues to keep in mind when you do your own installation. At the end of the article I added a Conclusions section, if you're not interested in the implementation details, but to read my take on the project, feel free to jump straight to the end from here.

My Test Case


Most of our production environments can be simplified to match the MHA's agent most simple use case: 1 master w/ 2 or more slaves and at least one more slave in an additional



  [Read more...]
Useful sed / awk liners for MySQL
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Listing some useful sed / awk liners to use with MySQL. I use these on occasion.

sed, awk & grep have many overlapping features. Some simple tasks can be performed by either. For example, stripping empty lines can be performed by either:

grep '.'
awk '/./'
sed '/./!d'
grep -v '^$'
awk '!/^$/'
sed '/^$/d'

It's a matter of taste & convention which tool and variation to use. So for any script I suggest, there may be many variations, possibly cleaner, shorter; feel free to comment.

mysqldump

The output of mysqldump is in particular useful when one wishes to make transformation on data or metadata.

  • Convert
  [Read more...]
MySQL Load Testing Framework – initial release
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It seems that everyone loves load testing these days. Problem is that everyone is using their own quick scripts, simple or complex, to drive their tests without the ability for other DBAs to duplicate those tests. Let’s say I write a great test and share my results and graphs on the blog – you want to run the same tests to see how your new DB servers compare in performance: this framework allows you to do that without duplicating any work or writing code. This is a basic release that will get the ball rolling. I’ve included some sample tests in the README file, so give them a try.

This codebase offers a user friendly framework for creating and visualizing MySQL database load test jobs. It is based around Sysbench, which is generally considered the industry standard load test application. The framework allows you to do the following:

    standardize your tests
  [Read more...]
Fun with Bash: aliases make your live easier… share your favorites
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I’ve always been a big fan of having a customized .bashrc file. The one I distribute to all of my servers has aliases for quick commands to save me time on the command line, functions that get work done when aliases are too simplistic, reporting for the server for each cli login, and of course a formatted and colored prompt (for terms that support colors). I also change certain aspects and commands based on the operating system since I’m not always on a redhat box or linux at all. Here’s my bashrc file – maybe you have some fun additions that you’d like to share. What saves you time on the command line?

Python for Automation: using pdsh for a menu-driven command execution environment
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I’ve been playing around with some quick system automation scripts that are handy to use when you don’t want / need to setup a chef or puppet action. I like to keep all of my hostnames and login details in a MySQL database (a cmdb actually) but for this example we’ll just use a couple of nested lists. This script executes commands in parallel across the hosts you choose in the menu system via the “pdsh” command, so make sure you have that installed before running. Alternately you can change the command call to use ssh instead of pdsh for a serialized execution, but that’s not as fun or fast. With some customizations here and there you can expand this to operate parallelized jobs for simplifying daily work in database administration, usage reporting, log file parsing, or other system automation as you see fit. Here’s the code. Comments welcome as

  [Read more...]
Showing entries 1 to 30 of 73 Next 30 Older Entries

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